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Thursday, February 28, 2013

February Issue of Boyd Briefs Released


The Boyd School of Law is very pleased to announce the release of Volume II, Issue 2, of Boyd Briefs.

Issued on a monthly basis, Boyd Briefs provides information about the scholarly and other activities of Boyd faculty members during the previous month. Illustrative entries announce new faculty publications, the drafting of briefs and uniform legislation, submission to administrative agencies of comments on proposed regulations, Clinic victories, the organization and hosting of academic conferences, appointments and elections of Boyd faculty members to local, national, and international boards, offices, and societies, and other honors and awards.

The February 2013 issue of Boyd Briefs announces a new book published by Cambridge University Press, an amicus brief submitted to the Supreme Court of the United States, several new law review articles, dozens of talks, several guest blog posts, and other accomplishments and activities. Congratulations, Boyd faculty members!

The Boyd Briefs archives may be accessed here.

Sunday, February 24, 2013

Boyd Team Takes Third Place in Bankruptcy Competition

The UNLV Boyd School of Law team of Sean Payne, Robert Telles, and Jennifer Isso, coached by alumnus Matt Knepper, won third place in the Duberstein Western Regional Bankruptcy Moot Court Competition held at the UNLV Boyd School of Law on February 23, 2013. The team's victory qualifies them for the national competition in New York on March 9-11, 2013.

The Duberstein Bankruptcy Moot Court Competition is one of the largest single site appellate moot court competitions and is considered one of the nation's preeminent moot court competitions. It is jointly sponsored by St. John’s University School of Law and the American Bankruptcy Institute.


Thursday, February 21, 2013

Cambridge University Press Publishes Professor Rowley's Commercial Contract Law: Transatlantic Perspectives

The Boyd School of Law is very pleased to announce that Cambridge University Press recently published Commercial Contract Law: Transatlantic Perspectives, edited by Professor Keith Rowley (with Larry A. DiMatteo, Qi Zhou, and Severine Saintier).

Commercial Contract Law focuses on the law of commercial contracts as constructed by the U.S. and UK legal systems and includes original scholarship that highlights current debates and trends from the two dominant common law systems. The chapters approach the subject areas from a variety of perspectives – doctrinal analysis, law and economic analysis, and social-legal studies, as well as other theoretical perspectives.

Commercial Contract Law covers the major themes that underlie the key debates relating to commercial contract law: role of consent; normative theories of contract law; contract design and good faith; implied terms and interpretation; policing contract behavior; misrepresentation, breach, and remedies; and the regional and international harmonization of contract law. Contributors provide insights on the many commonalities, but more interestingly, on the key divergences of the United States and United Kingdom's approaches to numerous areas of contract law. Such a comparative analysis provides a basis for future developments and improvements of commercial contract law in both countries, as well as other countries that are members of the common law systems.

Congratulations, Keith!


Monday, February 18, 2013

Boyd to Host Pro Lectureship on February 21

The Boyd School of Law is very pleased to announce that it will host the Annual Philip Pro Lectureship in Legal History on Thursday, February 21, 2013.

This year's Pro Lecture will be delivered by Tomiko Brown-Nagin, JD, PhD, Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, and Professor of History, Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Brown-Nagin will speak about her book, Courage to Dissent: Atlanta and the Long History of the Civil Rights Movement, published by Oxford University Press in 2011. Among many other awards, Courage to Dissent received the prestigious 2012 Bancroft Prize in U.S. History.

In her sweeping history of the Civil Rights movement in Atlanta -- the South's largest and most economically important city -- from the 1940s through 1980, Dr. Brown-Nagin shows that the movement featured a vast array of activists and many sophisticated approaches to activism. Long before "black power" emerged and gave black dissent from the mainstream civil rights agenda a new name, African Americans in Atlanta debated the meaning of equality and the steps necessary to obtain social and economic justice.

Dr. Brown-Nagin's groundbreaking book uncovers the activism of visionaries--both well-known legal figures and unsung citizens--from across the ideological spectrum who sought something different from, or more complicated than, "integration." Local activists often played leading roles in carrying out the integrationist agenda of the NAACP, but some also pursued goals that differed markedly from those of the venerable civil rights organization. Dr. Brown-Nagin discusses debates over politics, housing, public accommodations, and schools. She documents how the bruising battle over school desegregation in the 1970s, which featured opposing camps of African Americans, had its roots in the years before Brown v. Board of Education.

Exploring the complex interplay between the local and national, between lawyers and communities, between elites and grassroots, and between middle-class and working-class African Americans, Courage to Dissent tells gripping stories about the long struggle for equality that speak to the nation's current urban crisis. This remarkable book will transform our understanding of the Civil Rights era.

The Annual Philip Pro Lectureship in Legal History is free and open to the public. No RSVP required. Please join us on Thursday, February 21, 2013, at 7:30 p.m., in the Thomas & Mack Moot Court Facility. A reception will immediately follow Dr. Brown-Nagin's presentation. For more information regarding the lectureship, click here.

Sunday, February 17, 2013

Professor Garcia to Moderate "Fair Wages and Benefits for Las Vegas Workers" Panel on March 2

The Boyd School of Law is very pleased to announce that Professor Ruben Garcia will be moderating a "Fair Wages and Benefits for Las Vegas Workers" panel discussion on Saturday, March 2, 2013.

The "Fair Wages and Benefits" panel is the third in a series of community forums sponsored by Left of Center Gallery in collaboration with the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Las Vegas focusing on social justice. The first panel, held on February 16 and facilitated by Claytee White, Director of UNLV's Oral History Research Center, examined the battle for civil rights in Las Vegas. The second panel, held on February 23 and moderated by UNLV History Professor Andy Kirk, addressed nuclear weapons testing and its effects on civilian populations. In the third panel, Boyd's own Professor Garcia will moderate a panel focusing on the struggle for workers' rights in Las Vegas through the lens of five aspects of the history of Culinary Union Local 226, including: (1) the 1984 City-wide strike; (2) the Immigrant Workers Freedom Ride; (3) the Frontier Casino Strike; (4) the Workers' Fast at Palace Station; and (5) how the Culinary Union impacted the African-American community. The third panel will be held at the Left of Center Gallery, 2207 W. Gowan Road, North Las Vegas, on Saturday, March 2, from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.

Professor Garcia has written extensively on labor issues, including in his recently published book, Marginal Workers: How Legal Fault Lines Divide Workers and Leave Them without Protection (NYU Press 2012). Prior to joining Boyd's full-time faculty in 2011, Professor Garcia served as Professor of Law and Director of the Labor and Employment Law Program at California Western School of Law in San Diego, where he taught for eight years. Professor Garcia's research and teaching focus on the ways that race, gender, immigration and globalization impact the law of work. Professor Garcia's scholarly work has appeared in a number of prominent publications, including the University of Chicago Legal Forum, Hastings Law Journal, Florida State Law Review, Florida Law Review, the University of Pennsylvania Journal of Labor and Employment Law, the First Amendment Law Review, and the Journal of Gender, Race and Justice.

Friday, February 15, 2013

Professor Griffin Invited to Brief United States Commission on Civil Rights

The Boyd School of Law is very pleased to announce that Professor Leslie Griffin was invited by the United States Commission on Civil Rights to serve as a panelist at the Commission's briefing titled "Peaceful Coexistence? Reconciling Non-Discrimination Principles with Civil Liberties." The briefing is scheduled for Friday, March 22, 2013, at 9:00 a.m. EST at the Commission’s Headquarters in Washington, D.C.

The briefing in which Professor Griffin will participate will examine recent legal developments concerning the intersection of non-discrimination principles with those of civil liberties. The tension between religious liberties and non-discrimination statutes and policies is perhaps one of the more prominent areas of disagreement and is part of a broader debate between the First Amendment and non-discrimination provisions.

Among other topics, panelists also will discuss the issues raised by Hosanna-Tabor v. EEOC, 132 S.Ct. 694 (2012) and Christian Legal Society v. Martinez, 130 S.Ct. 2971 (2010). Professor Griffin recently examined the Hosanna-Tabor case in her forthcoming article, "The Sins of Hosanna-Tabor," 88 Indiana Law Journal --- (2013).

Professor Griffin currently serves as William S. Boyd Professor of Law. She is author of Law and Religion: Cases and Materials, editor of Law and Religion: Cases in Context, and author of numerous articles and book chapters about law, religion, politics and ethics. Professor Griffin is a graduate of Yale University (M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D., Religious Studies) and Stanford Law School.

Congratulations, Leslie!

Thursday, February 14, 2013

Two Articles by Professor Lipman Forthcoming Spring 2013

The Boyd School of Law is very pleased to announce that Professor Francine Lipman has two new law review articles scheduled for publication in spring 2013.

One of Professor Lipman's articles, "Access to Tax Injustice," is forthcoming in Issue 5 of Volume 40 of the Pepperdine Law Review. The article, which is scheduled for publication in a "Tax Advice for the Second Obama Administration" symposium issue forthcoming later this spring, examines access to the most successful antipoverty program for working lower-income families with children, the earned income tax credit (EITC). At almost 40 years young, the EITC lifts more children out of poverty each year than any other program in America today. Nevertheless, because the EITC is a social benefit program delivered through the federal income tax system by the Internal Revenue Service, America's revenue collector, EITC beneficiaries bear meaningful access to tax justice costs. Professor Lipman's article discusses these costs and proposes specific opportunities to empower, rather than undermine this long-term, successful, bipartisan antipoverty tax provision. To download Professor Lipman's article, please click here.

Professor Lipman has a second article that is also forthcoming this spring. Titled, "The Social Security Benefits Formula and the Windfall Elimination Provision: An Equitable Approach to Addressing 'Windfall' Benefits" (with Alan Smith), the piece will be published shortly in the University of Notre Dame Law School's Journal of Legislation.

Professor Lipman joined the faculty in July 2012, bringing an exceptional record as an accountant, a lawyer, a teacher, and a scholar. Professor Lipman is an elected member of the American Law Institute and a chair and editor for the Tax Section of the American Bar Association. She has written extensively on tax and accounting issues for legal journals, including the Wisconsin Law Review, Florida Tax Review, Virginia Tax Review, Nevada Law Journal, American University Law Review, Harvard Environmental Law Review, Harvard Latino Law Review, Harvard Journal on Legislation, The Tax Lawyer, The Practical Tax Lawyer, and Taxes and Tax Notes. Professor Lipman is a frequent speaker on tax subjects to law and business groups.

Professor Trimble Guest Blogs on Eric Goldman's Technology & Marketing Law Blog

The Boyd School of Law is very pleased to announce that Professor Marketa Trimble guest blogged on Eric Goldman's Technology & Marketing Law Blog on February 13, 2013.

Titled "Territorial Implications of Antigua's Internet-Based IP Sanctions Against the US," Professor Trimble's guest blog post offers three reasons why the recent decision by the World Trade Organization (WTO) authorizing Antigua to suspend its intellectual property obligations towards the United States in retaliation for the United States' breach of WTO rules is notable. First, the Antigua story shows the inherent danger that exists when intellectual property issues are included in general trade negotiations and trade treaties, such as the WTO negotiations and the TRIPS Agreement. Second, the story exposes the problems that arise when a country attempts to design sanctions on the Internet against another country in such a way that the sanctions will both target intellectual property and remain territorially limited. Third, the story highlights the problem of evasion of geolocation and filtering measures. To read Professor Trimble's complete guest blog post, click here.

Professor Trimble joined Boyd's full-time faculty in 2010, bringing expertise in Conflict of Laws, Patent Law, Cyberlaw, International Intellectual Property Law, Private International Law, Intellectual Property, Copyright Law, European Union Law, and Comparative Law. She is a graduate of Stanford Law School (J.S.D., 2010; J.S.M., 2006) and the Law School of Charles University in Prague (Ph.D., 2002; JUDr., 2001; and Mgr., 1997).





Professor Griffin to Give "Important 2012-2013 Supreme Court Cases" CLE

The Boyd School of Law is very pleased to announce that Professor Leslie Griffin will give an "Important 2012-2013 Supreme Court Cases" continuing legal education presentation on February 15.

During the CLE, Professor Griffin will review important cases on the Supreme Court’s 2012-2013 docket, including Fisher v. University of Texas (affirmative action), Windsor v. United States and Hollingsworth v. Perry (same-sex marriage), Shelby County v. Holder (Voting Rights Act), and other notable First, Fourth and Fifth Amendment cases.

The program, which will be held in the Thomas and Mack Moot Court Facility and has been approved for one CLE credit, will begin at 3:00 p.m. on February 15. Additional registration information is available here.

Professors Johnson and Rawson to Give "Introduction to Transactional Drafting" CLE

The Boyd School of Law is very pleased to announce that Professor Lori Johnson and Adjunct Professor Rick Rawson are scheduled to give an "Introduction to Transactional Drafting" continuing legal education on February 22, 2013.

The program, which is co-sponsored with the State Bar of Nevada, will introduce beginning lawyers to critical skills for contract drafting that practitioners of all backgrounds may encounter, with a focus in the area of real estate law. Seasoned lawyers who are new to the field of transactional work may also find the session helpful to expand and hone their contract drafting skills. The session will begin with tips on successfully identifying and drafting the main components of a contract (including recitals, representations, warranties, covenants, and conditions), and move into more specific tips about drafting in the real estate context (including conveyances and free available resources).

The CLE, which begins at 1:30 p.m. on February 22, will be held in the Thomas & Mack Moot Court Facility and has been approved for 3.0 CLE credits. Additional registration information is available here.

Sunday, February 10, 2013

Professor Griffin Guest Blogs on ACSblog

The Boyd School of Law is very pleased to announce that Professor Leslie Griffin guest blogged on the ACSblog on February 8, 2013. Titled "Did Obama Ignore Religious Freedom of Millions of Americans? Yes and No," Professor Griffin's post explains that the Obama administration recently offered more accommodations to the religious employers who oppose women’s reproductive freedom and seek exemption from the Affordable Care Act’s mandate that employee insurance coverage extend to contraception and sterilization.

According to Professor Griffin, "The employers won two big victories. First, the definition of religious employer was expanded to include not only organizations where everyone shares one faith but also those that employ or provide services to individuals who are not members of the same religious community. Second, the employers will not have to provide the coverage. Instead, the insurance companies will independently contact employees and make separate contraceptive policies available to them at no charge. The insurance companies will cover the costs of this new arrangement and, presumably, pass them on to other consumers." To read more, click here.

Professor Griffin currently serves as William S. Boyd Professor of Law. She is author of Law and Religion: Cases and Materials; editor of Law and Religion: Cases in Context; and author of numerous articles and book chapters about law, religion, politics and ethics. Professor Griffin is a graduate of Yale University (M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D., Religious Studies) and Stanford Law School.

Friday, February 8, 2013

Professor Griffin Featured in Las Vegas City Life Article

The Boyd School of Law is very pleased to announce that Professor Leslie Griffin was featured in a Las Vegas City Life article published on February 6, 2013. Titled "The Dangerous Illusion of Abortion Rights," the article lauded a panel convened on January 31, 2013, by Planned Parenthood of Southern Nevada that included Professor Griffin as well as Congresswoman Shelley Berkley, UNLV History Professor Joanne Goodwin, and Director of UNLV's Jean Nidetch Women's Center Christina Hernandez.

At the January 31 program, Professor Griffin and her co-panelists examined the past, present, and uncertain future of abortion access. "A passionate crowd of nearly 100 people — perhaps half of them born after the court ruling, most of them women and among them doctors and medical students — listened intently and shared their own stories."

Professor Griffin currently serves as William S. Boyd Professor of Law. She is author of Law and Religion: Cases and Materials; editor of Law and Religion: Cases in Context; and author of numerous articles and book chapters about law, religion, politics and ethics. Professor Griffin is a graduate of Yale University (M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D., Religious Studies) and Stanford Law School.

Friday, February 1, 2013

January Issue of Boyd Briefs Released


The Boyd School of Law is very pleased to announce the release of Volume II, Issue 1, of Boyd Briefs.

Issued on a monthly basis, Boyd Briefs provides information about the scholarly and other activities of Boyd faculty members during the previous month. Illustrative entries announce new faculty publications, the drafting of briefs and uniform legislation, submission to administrative agencies of comments on proposed regulations, Clinic victories, the organization and hosting of academic conferences, appointments and elections of Boyd faculty members to local, national, and international boards, offices, and societies, and other honors and awards.

The January 2013 issue of Boyd Briefs announces several new faculty honors, talks, and other activities. Congratulations, Boyd faculty members!

The Boyd Briefs archives may be accessed here.