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Friday, January 30, 2015

Professor Jean Sternlight Speaks to Southwestern School of Law Faculty  

Jean Sternlight is the Michael and Sonja Saltman Professor of Law and the director of the Saltman Center for Conflict Resolution at the UNLV William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Jan. 23, Professor Sternlight traveled to Southwestern School of Law to present to faculty her paper titled “Why Mediators Should Care about the Psychology of Ethics.” Founded more than 100 years ago, Southwestern School of Law is located in Los Angeles. 

Professor Sternlight is nationally and internationally recognized for her scholarship and law reform activities in the field of dispute resolution.

Boyd Alumnus Oscar Peralta ’14 Joins Henness & Haight

Boyd alumnus Oscar Peralta ’14 was featured in a Jan. 29 article on the Press Release Rocket website titled “Las Vegas Injury Attorneys Henness and Haight Welcome Oscar Peralta.” Press Release Rocket is an independent news agency that covers finance news, including breaking news, mergers and rumors and expert analysis.

Peralta is excited for the new opportunity.

“I am very pleased to join Henness & Haight, a firm with an established reputation of providing the highest level of service to injured victims,” Peralta said in the release. “My mission as an attorney is to work tirelessly to vindicate the rights of my clients, to always keep my clients’ best interests in mind, and to obtain the best possible outcome for each of them. I know of no better way to pursue this mission than as part of the outstanding team of attorneys and legal professionals at Henness & Haight.”

Henness and Haight is a personal injury law firm offering legal services to anyone injured in Nevada who needs representation.

Professor Nancy Rapoport Interviewed by Las Vegas Review-Journal

Nancy B. Rapoport is the Gordon Silver Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Jan. 28, the Las Vegas Review-Journal ran an article titled “Judge’s ruling on Chicago court seen as win for Caesars” discussing the Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing by Caesars Entertainment Corp. and the recent ruling allowing the company’s reorganization to take place in Chicago.

The ruling was a clear win for Caesars, said Professor Rapoport in the article. However, she also cautioned it was still early to tell how the case will proceed.

“A lot depends on what unrolls over the next few weeks,” she said. “This is a complicated, big bankruptcy with a lot of thorny issues.”

Professor Rapoport's specialties are bankruptcy ethics, ethics in governance, and the depiction of lawyers in popular culture. 

Professor Michael Kagan Quoted in Associated Press and Times Union

Michael Kagan is co-director of the Immigration Clinic at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Jan. 28, Professor Kagan was quoted in a Jan. 28 Times Union article picked up from the Associated Press titled “Gov. Brian Sandoval, AG Laxalt diverge on immigration suit.”

In the article, which discussed Nevada Attorney General Adam Laxalt’s challenge to President Obama’s immigration order and Governor Brian Sandoval’s differing view on the matter, Professor Kagan offered insight into the situation made more controversial because Governor Sandoval endorsed the fellow Republican.

“It’s politically a more interesting question than legally,” Professor Kagan said. “It shows two different visions in the Republican Party.”

Professor Kagan has written several of the most widely cited articles in the fields of refugee and asylum law. His research on credibility assessment in asylum cases has been repeatedly relied on by federal appellate courts and, according to a 2012 commentary, has "guided most subsequent research and analysis on the topic."

Professor Ruben Garcia Featured in Las Vegas Review-Journal

Ruben J. Garcia is a professor of law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Jan. 25, the Las Vegas Review-Journal published an article titled “Motives behind proposed Las Vegas whistleblower rules questioned” which discussed the introduction of a bill designed to protect city whistleblowers disclosing government misdeeds from “reprisals or retaliatory action.”

While the proposed law is meant to encourage and protect whistleblowers, Professor Garcia believes it also protects employers on the lookout for lawsuits.

“It’s a strategic decision for the employee,” he said in the article. “Depending on how it’s set up, (the appeals process) might be beneficial to those who don’t need a full-scale lawsuit.

“But we do know, at the federal level, that these processes are used to discourage lawsuits at an administrative stage,” Professor Garcia continued.

A recognized expert in the field of labor and employment law, Professor Garcia teaches Labor Law, Employment Law, Constitutional Law, and Professional Responsibility at the Boyd School of Law. He has been quoted in the Los Angeles Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Las Vegas Review-Journal, among others, and has appeared on national and local radio and television programs.

Thursday, January 29, 2015

Jan. 29 Boyd Briefs Now Available

The Jan. 29 edition of Boyd Briefs is now available.

This week's edition features Professor Anne Traum, student Michael Alires, and alumna Alissa Cooley '14. 

Professor Traum's hallmark is drawing on theory to propose sensible reforms that can reasonably be implemented within the existing legal rules or with only incremental change. With increasing interest in criminal justice reform both on the bench and in the halls of policy makers, Professor Traum's fresh voice is being heard on the national stage.

Now in his third year, Alires works as a part of the Small Business and Nonprofit Clinic's inaugural class. He also has served on the Student Bar Association Board of Governors, as a member of the UNLV Gaming Law Journal, and as Vice President of the UNLV Graduate and Professional Student Association.

Immigration law is a new passion for Cooley. Though long interested in indigent defense and the protection of constitutional rights, she had never considered immigration law as an outlet. Her first experience with immigration law occurred in the fall of her 4L year, when she assisted in the release of a student-authored report on the conditions of confinement for immigrant detainees at the Henderson Detention Center.

To subscribe to Boyd Briefs, visit law.unlv.edu/BoydBriefs.

Friday, January 23, 2015

Professor Mary Berkheiser Featured in Las Vegas Review-Journal

Mary Berkheiser serves as professor of law, director of clinical programs, and director of the Juvenile Justice Clinic at the Boyd School of Law.

On Jan. 22, the Las Vegas Review-Journal ran an article covering the “’15 to Life: Kenneth’s Story’ Every Child Deserves a Second Chance” event Professor Berkheiser organized at Boyd’s Thomas & Mack Moot Court. The article, titled “UNLV event focuses on life-without-parole sentences for juveniles,” explored the issue of juveniles given life sentences without the possibility of parole and how proposed new legislation can make a difference in the future sentencing of youth.

“In our current criminal justice system, it is legal to sentence children to die in prison,” said Professor Berkheiser, an advocate for juvenile defense and protecting the rights of children, in the article. “We need to change that. The lives of these young men matter.”

Professor Berkheiser's areas of expertise include clinical legal education and teaching, criminal procedure, juvenile law, criminal law, and appellate law.

Jan. 22 Boyd Briefs Now Available

The Jan. 22 edition of Boyd Briefs is now available.

This week's edition features Professor Addie Rolnick, student Jackie Witt, and alumna Katelyn Franklin '14.

Professor Rolnick has created a practicum in Tribal Law. Under her supervision, students can complete independent legislative drafting and legal research projects for local tribes. Professor Rolnick's research focuses on improving tribal juvenile and criminal justice systems.

Witt was drawn to Boyd for its curricular offerings and experiential opportunities in Indian Law as well as its unmatched gaming law curriculum. Now in her second year, she is vice chair of Boyd's Native American Law Students Association and is a member of the UNLV Gaming Law Journal.

After studying indigenous peoples and their struggles to maintain land and their political, cultural, and other fundamental rights against the forces of mainstream ideological and physical displacement, Franklin was drawn to law school. Currently, she represents unaccompanied children from Central America as a justice AmeriCorps member in Boyd's Immigration Clinic.

To subscribe to Boyd Briefs, visit law.unlv.edu/BoydBriefs.

Professor Francine Lipman to Present at American Bar Association Midyear Meeting

Francine J. Lipman is a William S. Boyd Professor of Law at UNLV.

Professor Lipman will attend the American Bar Association (ABA) Section of Taxation 2015 Midyear Meeting in Houston from Jan. 29-31, where she will present her research on tax benefits for diverse low-income working families as part of a panel presentation.

The ABA meeting brings together leading attorneys and government officials to discuss the latest federal tax policies, initiatives, regulations, legislative forecasts and ideas.

Professor Lipman has written extensively on tax and accounting issues for legal journals, including the Wisconsin Law Review, Florida Tax Review, Virginia Tax Review, Nevada Law Journal, American University Law Review, Harvard Environmental Law Review, Harvard Latino Law Review, Harvard Journal on Legislation, The Tax Lawyer, The Practical Tax Lawyer, Taxes and Tax Notes.

Professor Sara Gordon to Speak to Federal Public Defender’s Office

Sara Gordon is an associate professor at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Jan. 29, Professor Gordon will give a presentation titled “Schema Theory and ‘Plain Language’ Jury Instructions” to the Federal Public Defender’s office in Las Vegas.

The Federal Public Defender’s office provides federal criminal defense services to those unable to afford representation.

Professor Gordon's research focuses on law and psychology and the impact of cognitive and social psychology on jurors and other legal decision-makers.

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Professor Angela Morrison Writes Article for Hamilton and Griffin on Rights, Featured on SCOTUSblog

Angela Morrison is a Visiting Assistant Professor at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Jan. 17, her article, "Avoiding the Merits: The Court Hears Argument in Mach Mining, LLC, v. EEOC.," was published on the Hamilton and Griffin on Rights blog, co-created by Boyd's Professor Leslie Griffin. On Jan. 19, Professor Morrison's guest blog post was mentioned in the SCOTUSblog Monday round-up.

Her article reads, "Too often, individuals against whom employers have discriminated are left without remedy because of protracted litigation over conciliation. Unfortunately, this week’s oral argument suggests that this will not change and fits with the Court’s overall trend of putting roadblocks in the path to remedy for victims of corporate wrong-doing. As a result, employers will be able to continue to avoid or delay decisions on the merits for years."

Professor Morrison graduated from the Boyd School of Law where she was the editor-in-chief of the Nevada Law Journal and was a student attorney in the Immigration Clinic. Professor Morrison teaches in the Immigration Clinic and Employment Discrimination.

Professor Fatma Marouf Writes Article for Hamilton and Griffin on Rights, Featured on SCOTUSblog

Fatma Marouf is the co-director of the Immigration Clinic and an associate professor at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Jan. 15, Professor Marouf wrote an article titled, "Sock it to Him: Deportation for Drug Paraphernalia," for the Hamilton and Griffin on Rights blog, co-created by Boyd's Professor Leslie Griffin. On Jan. 16, her guest blog post was mentioned on SCOTUSblog's Friday round-up.

In her blog post  about Moones Mellouli, a master's degree student who was deported after possessing a sock that contained Adderall (socks are considered drug paraphernalia under Kansas law) Professor Marouf writes, "There is much at stake here, not just for immigrants but also for criminal defense attorneys. As low-level crimes, paraphernalia offenses are usually disposed of quickly with plea agreements. If the Court sides with the government in this case, it would greatly complicate a criminal defense lawyer’s duty under Padilla v. Kentucky, 559 U.S. 356 (2010) to advise defendants about the immigration consequences of a conviction."

Drawing on her extensive experience representing individuals before the Immigration Courts, Board of Immigration Appeals, and U.S. Courts of Appeals, Professor Marouf's research probes various problems involved in adjudicating immigration cases at all levels.

Thursday, January 15, 2015

Professor Nancy Rapoport Quoted in Las Vegas Review-Journal

Nancy B. Rapoport is the Gordon Silver Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Jan. 15, Professor Rapoport was quoted in the Las Vegas Review-Journal article "Caesars puts largest unit into bankruptcy; judge to issue modified stay."

The article reads, "UNLV Boyd School of Law professor Nancy Rapoport, who specializes in bankruptcy matters, said it was 'a little unusual' that the competing bankruptcy filings took place in different states. Caesars operates two casinos in Illinois, Harrah’s Metropolis and Harrah’s Joliet, which allowed the company to file its action in the state. 'The easiest thing is to dismiss the involuntary case,' Rapoport said. 'The unsecured creditors are just trying to take control and preserve their rights.'"

Professor Rapoport's specialties are bankruptcy ethics, ethics in governance, and the depiction of lawyers in popular culture. 

Professor Fatma Marouf Quoted in Las Vegas Sun

Fatma Marouf is the co-director of the Immigration Clinic and an associate professor at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

Professor Marouf was quoted in the Jan. 15 Las Vegas Sun article, "Study: Nearly half of Clark County’s unauthorized immigrants qualify for deportation relief."

In regard to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents program, Professor Marouf said, "There might be people with convictions who are eligible but unsure, or people who can’t afford the $500 fee. There tends to be a lot of confusion about these programs, and there is still a lot of fear."

Drawing on her extensive experience representing individuals before the Immigration Courts, Board of Immigration Appeals, and U.S. Courts of Appeals, Professor Marouf's research probes various problems involved in adjudicating immigration cases at all levels.

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Boyd Student Janine Lee Joins Authors Article for American Bankruptcy Institute Journal

Boyd student Janine Lee recently authored an article, titled “The Individual Chapter 11 ‘Double Whammy’ Conundrum,” for the January issue of the American Bankruptcy Institute Journal.

The article, which examines the Ice House America LLC v. Cardin case regarding pre-petition property of individual debtors in Chapter 11 cases, reads, “The ‘double whammy’ discussed by the Sixth Circuit presents quite a conundrum for the individual chapter 11 debtor. A strict application of the absolute priority rule to individual chapter 11 debtors (the ‘narrow view’) could result in a debtor’s surrender of both pre-petition property and future earnings to creditors in order to confirm a non-consensual plan. Under those circumstances, confirmation of such a plan seems almost – if not entirely – impossible. Alternatively, the conclusion that the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 abrogated the absolute priority rule as to individual debtors may result in providing such debtors with a realistic opportunity to reorganize and successfully exit bankruptcy, just as a chapter 13 debtor can do.”

Lee is a 2016 Boyd School of Law J.D. candidate and a senior paralegal at The Schwartz Law Firm Inc. in Las Vegas.

Friday, January 9, 2015

Dean Dan Hamilton and Associate Dean Ngai Pindell Promote LL.M. in National Law Journal

Dan Hamilton is the dean and Richard J. Morgan Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

Ngai Pindell is associate dean of academic affairs and professor of law at the Boyd School of Law.

On Jan. 8, The National Law Journal interviewed both Dean Hamilton and Dean Pindell for an article titled “UNLV Law Betting on First Gambling Industry LL.M.

The feature highlighted the new Master of Laws degree in Gaming Law and Regulation and the idea behind it, as well as the law school’s and university’s unique offerings related to gaming and gaming research and training.

According to Dean Pindell, the idea is to prepare graduates to practice within the sphere of casinos and gambling regulation.

“We’re certainly seeing an increase in gaming activity in the U.S. and across the world,” he said in the article. “And there is a lot of activity at the state and local government level in trying to figure out things like the tax implication of gaming and the impact of casinos on communities.”

All of this gives Las Vegas a distinct advantage, said Dean Hamilton.

“Gaming law is a sophisticated and growing field both nationally and internationally, and our goal is to be the national leader in training those interested in gaming law,” he continued.

Dean Hamilton researches and writes primarily on American property ideology and the legal and constitutional issues raised by the Civil War. He has written numerous articles and reviews on American legal history.

Dean Pindell's research interests are in economic development and housing, and he teaches Property, Land Use Regulation, Local Government Law and Wills, Trusts & Estates.

American Gaming Association Praises UNLV for LL.M. Offering

On Jan. 7, the Las Vegas Review-Journal ran an article titled “UNLV praised for creating master’s degree program in gambling law.”

The article read, “’We congratulate UNLV for recognizing the challenges of our complex industry and providing students an opportunity to gain a better understanding of the myriad regulations we face,’ Sara Rayme, senior vice president of public affairs for the American Gaming Association, said in a statement. ’From rules that regulate the shipping of slot machines to requirements for licensing a wide range of employees, students will quickly discover that gaming overcomes hurdles unlike any other industry in order to create jobs and provide vital revenues to communities across the country.’”

Boyd Alumna Kendal Weisenmiller ’10 Joins Dickinson Wright PLLC

Boyd alumna Kendal Weisenmiller ’10 was highlighted in a Jan. 8 article on the InsuranceNewsNet website titled “Dickinson Wright PLLC Expands Las Vegas Office with Addition of Eight Attorneys.”

Weisenmiller is one of several new attorneys to join Dickinson Wright, a general practice law firm that offers full service legal solutions to local and national business clients. 

“We are always looking for the right opportunities to provide the best services and legal talents to our clients,” said Dickinson Wright CEO William T. Burgess in the article. “ … The eight attorneys joining our firm’s Las Vegas office are some of the best and brightest in their fields of law. This expansion allows us to offer our clients a wider range of services in Las Vegas to support their needs. As the New Year begins, we are very excited for this opportunity to expand our presence in Las Vegas.”

Weisenmiller is a litigator practicing civil and commercial litigation, including probate and trust litigation, guardianship and family law, with experience in bankruptcy.

Wednesday, January 7, 2015

Boyd Faculty Attend Association of American Law Schools 2015 Meeting

Many William S. Boyd School of Law faculty members recently attended the Association of American Law Schools 2015 Annual Meeting held Jan. 2 through 5 in Washington, D.C.

The theme of this year’s meeting, Legal Education at the Crossroads, focused on the state of American legal education today and its effect on students, faculty, and the profession at-large.

This year, the Boyd School of Law was again significantly represented at several key events, beginning with a reception hosted by the school on Friday, Jan. 2.

On Saturday, Jan. 3, UNLV Executive Vice President and Provost John Valery White participated on a panel titled “Higher Ed and Legal Ed: Partnering for Success in Challenging Times.” The panel, which brought together former law school deans who are now working in university leadership roles, facilitated discussion about the ways deans and university leaders can work together to further strategic goals.

On Sunday, Jan. 4, Professor Ruben Garcia sat on a panel titled “Working but Poor: Understanding and Confronting the Working Poor Phenomenon” in which panelists examined the increasing number of working poor and explored possible causes.

On Monday, Jan. 5, Professor Addie Rolnick chaired a Law and Anthropology panel titled “Legislating Belonging” in which roundtable participants explored legal and social indices of belonging in various political communities.

Las Vegas Sun Writes about New Master’s Degree in Gaming Law

On Jan. 6, the Las Vegas Sun ran an article titled “UNLV to offer master’s degree in gambling law, regulation.”

The article reads, “UNLV is preparing to welcome students to its first master's degree program in gambling law and regulation. The university's law school is launching the program this fall.”

The article continues, “Daniel Hamilton, dean of the Boyd School of Law, says the university is uniquely situated to do so.”

Dean Dan Hamilton Speaks to KNPR’s State of Nevada About Gaming Law

Dan Hamilton is the dean and Richard J. Morgan Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Jan. 6, Dean Hamilton sat with KNPR’s State of Nevada to discuss the Boyd School of Law’s new Master of Laws degree in Gaming Law and Regulation. The interview, titled “UNLV's Boyd Law School Expands Gaming Law Program,” discussed the expansion of gaming both nationally and internationally and the rare breed of lawyers needed to navigate and understand the legal arena of this specialized industry.

When asked whether there was enough of a demand to offer a post-graduate law degree in gaming, Dean Hamilton said, “We believe there is.”

“So 15 years ago the law school’s mission was to become one of the top public law schools in the United States, and it has achieved that goal in a very short and impressive period of time,” Dean Hamilton continued. “So now with that identity solidified, we can turn to areas that give us an advantage here in Las Vegas and around the nation.

“Gaming law is a growing and sophisticated and dynamic area of the law that is growing, of course, in Las Vegas, but also in Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts, and in Macau, of course the biggest gaming center in the world. And it may be coming to Japan and other parts of Asia so the demand for expertise in these important policy and legal questions that you present is something that we at the law school – we really think we are in the best position to bring the best training in gaming law anywhere.”

Dean Hamilton researches and writes primarily on American property ideology and the legal and constitutional issues raised by the Civil War. He has written numerous articles and reviews on American legal history.

Tuesday, January 6, 2015

Professor Trimble to Present at the World Intellectual Property Organization in Geneva

Associate Professor Marketa Trimble will present at the WIPO-ILA Seminar on Intellectual Property and Private International Law on Jan. 16, 2015, at the headquarters of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) in Geneva, Switzerland.

The seminar is co-organized by WIPO and the International Law Association (ILA) and will feature experts on intellectual property law and conflict of laws (private international law). Most of the presenters are members of the ILA Committee on Intellectual Property and Private International Law, which has developed guidelines to facilitate easier transnational enforcement of intellectual property rights such as copyright, patents and trademarks. The guidelines include rules concerning jurisdiction of courts, rules on choice of law that should apply to disputes, and rules on the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments in intellectual property law matters. Professor Trimble chairs the Committee’s Subcommittee on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Judgments.

Professor Trimble joins other experts presenting at the Seminar, including Professors Joost Blom (U. of British Columbia), Josef Drexl (Max Planck Institute for Innovation and Competition), Rochelle C. Dreyfuss (NYU), Jane C. Ginsburg (Columbia), Toshiyuki Kono (Kyushu University), Axel Metzger (Humboldt University), Pedro de Miguel Asensio (Complutense University of Madrid), Dario Manuel Lentz Moura Vicente (University of Lisbon), and Marta Pertegas (Hague Conference on Private International Law).