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Thursday, October 30, 2014

Oct. 30 Boyd Briefs Now Available

The Oct. 30 edition of Boyd Briefs is now available.

This week's edition features Professor Sara Gordon, student Amanda Stevens, and alumna Danielle Oakley '06.

Professor Gordon is part of a cohort of Boyd faculty members who write about law and psychology. Her most recent piece titled, "All Together Now: Using Principles of Group Dynamic to Train Better Jurors," examines training in group decisionmaking and applies them to the unique context of jury decisionmaking.

Stevens is in her fourth and final year at Boyd. After law school, she intends to draw upon her past business experiences and credentials in commercial litigation practice.

Oakley currently works at the Newport Beach office of O'Melveny & Meyers LLP. As a financial services attorney, she represents bank and non-bank financial-services providers in class action litigation and regulatory enforcement actions.

To subscribe to Boyd Briefs, visit law.unlv.edu/BoydBriefs.

Professor Marketa Trimble Publishes Article on Technology & Marketing Law Blog

Marketa Trimble is a Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Oct. 29, she published an article titled, "The New U.K. Online Gambling Law: Cyberlaw 3.0 – or a Return to Cyberlaw 2.0?" on the Technology & Marketing Law Blog.

In the post, she writes, "The 2014 Act might not be a step back to cyberlaw 2.0; it might in fact be a step toward cyberlaw 3.0. Cyberlaw 2.0 was designed to serve a country’s objectives of having its laws and regulations govern all those persons and entities whose activities on the internet reached customers in its jurisdiction. However, a country could not achieve its objectives without effective cooperation from other countries in enforcement against persons and entities outside the country’s enforcement power. Cyberlaw 3.0 gives equal weight to other countries’ abilities to assert their own laws and regulations, thereby preventing the “struggle to assert national sovereignty over policy choices” against which Michael Geist warned in 2003. By taking responsibility for enforcement in its own jurisdiction, the U.K. regulator can effectively cooperate with regulators in other countries and ensure that online gambling laws and regulations are respected by those who operate in the United Kingdom." 

In her research, Professor Trimble focuses on intellectual property and issues at the intersection of intellectual property and private international law/conflict of laws.

Professor Nancy Rapoport Visits Fredrickson & Byron Law Firm

Nancy B. Rapoport is the Gordon Silver Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Oct. 30, Professor Rapoport traveled to Minneapolis to visit the Fredrickson & Byron law firm.

She met with lawyers and clients to discuss ethics and social media.

Professor Rapoport's specialties are bankruptcy ethics, ethics in governance, and the depiction of lawyers in popular culture. 

Professor Mary LaFrance Attends Sixth Annual Symposium of the Review of Intellectual Property Law

Mary LaFrance is the IGT Professor of Intellectual Property Law at the UNLV William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Oct. 24, Professor LaFrance presented her paper, “Panorama Rights in the United States,” at the Sixth Annual Symposium of the Review of Intellectual Property Law titled, Art Meets Law: The Intersection of Art and Intellectual Property. The event was hosted by the John Marshall Law School in Chicago.

Professor LaFrance additionally attended the Future of Music Coalition Policy Summit in Washington, D.C. from Oct. 27 to 28, where she participated in conversations on copyright policy issues, business practices, and technology developments affecting the music industry.

Professor LaFrance’s teaching and research interests include domestic and international intellectual property law, as well as the taxation of intellectual property.

Professor Keith Rowley Presents at Symposium to Honor Professor Charles L. Knapp’s 50th Year of Law Teaching

Keith A. Rowley is a William S. Boyd Professor of Law.

On Oct. 24, Professor Rowley delivered the Marvin Anderson Lecture, “Contracts for Geniuses (and Mere Mortals),” at the University of California Hastings College of Law in San Francisco.

The lecture was given as a part of the Symposium to Honor Professor Charles L. Knapp’s 50th Year of Law Teaching.

Professor Rowley writes primarily in the areas of contracts, commercial law, and law and popular culture.

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Saltman Center 10th Anniversary Promoted on KNPR News

Richard Goldstone, human rights lawyer and judge, on Oct. 28 spoke with KNPR News ahead of his visit to the William S. Boyd School of Law for the Saltman Center for Conflict Resolution’s 10th anniversary celebration.

In the interview, titled “Making Peace: Lessons from Mandela,” Goldstone shared the lessons he learned from the South African leader while leading the commission to resolve the tension stemming from the country’s journey from apartheid to democracy.

Goldstone is one of four panel speakers who will celebrate the center’s anniversary on Nov. 1 by reflecting on Nelson Mandela and his contributions to conflict resolution.

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Rachael Adair Featured on UNLV News Center

Rachael Adair is associate director of Career Development and judicial clerkship coordinator at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Oct. 27, she was featured on the UNLV News Center in an article titled “New Faces: Rachael Adair.” The article is part of a UNLV News Center series that features new faculty and staff at the university. 

The Career Development Office provides Boyd students and alumni with career information, assistance, and networking connections and opportunities. Networking is something Rachael hopes to strongly encourage all students interested in positioning themselves for success to do.

“When I was in law school, networking was a dreaded word that made me cringe each time I heard it… Over time, I have learned the true value of networking and establishing relationships early, but it took me years until I reached that ‘a-ha’ moment. I hope to encourage students to network while they are in school so they can begin to cultivate relationships that will inevitably become of increasing importance as they move throughout their career,” she said in her profile.

Friday, October 24, 2014

Boyd Alumnus Joe Bonaventure ’01 Featured in Las Vegas Review-Journal

On Oct. 15, Boyd alumnus Joe Bonaventure ’01 was featured in the Las Vegas Review-Journal’s “Newsmakers, Oct. 16-22, 2014” feature.

Bonaventure, vice chief judge of the Las Vegas Justice Court, was unanimously selected the court’s next chief judge in a special judges’ meeting held in August.

He will begin a two-year term in January.

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Oct. 23 Boyd Briefs Now Available

The Oct. 23 edition of Boyd Briefs is now available.

This week's edition features Professor Michael Kagan, student Andrea Orwoll, and alumnus Jonathan Winn '12.

Professor Kagan is the Co-Director of Boyd's Immigration Clinic. As an accomplished scholar and popular teacher, he exhibits the depth and breadth of knowledge of a true intellectual, but also the cleverness of a trial lawyer.

Andrea is a first-year Boyd student seeking to assist populations in need. Her interests and experiences make her a synergistic fit with the law school's Public Interest Fellowship Program, which will help Orwoll achieve her long-term service objectives.

Jonathan is an associate attorney at Kolesar & Leatham. His practice includes corporate and commercial transactions, land use matters, and privilege business licensing.

To subscribe to Boyd Briefs, visit law.unlv.edu/BoydBriefs.

Professional Development and Public Interest Coordinator Nikki Harris to Attend Equal Justice Works Conference and Career Fair

From Oct. 24 to 25, Nikki Harris, professional development and public interest coordinator at the Boyd School of Law, will attend the Equal Justice Works Conference and Career Fair in Bethesda, Md. It is the largest national public interest legal career fair in the country. More than 1,200 students, 130 employers, and faculty, staff and practitioners in the public interest field are expected to attend. Nikki will attend networking events, as well as workshops on various public interest careers and trends and job search advice.

Third-year Boyd School of Law students Bailey Bortolin and Alexander Quagge will also attend the Equal Justice Works Conference and Career Fair to interview with employers and LL.M. program administrators.

Nikki plans to return from the conference with information and relationships which can benefit Boyd students and alumni as they navigate their legal careers in the public interest arena.

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Black Law Students Association Has Outstanding Fall Semester


The Black Law Students Association (BLSA) is on the move to bring its theme of empowerment to life at the William S. Boyd School of Law. The organization kicked off its action-filled fall semester with a picture day, and continued to count successes with the LVNBA scholarship gala, general body meeting, and the second annual academic retreat. The BLSA picture day was designed to provide members with professional photographs that give credence to their online professional portfolios. The LVNBA Scholarship Gala featured five BLSA members receiving academic scholarships, and the general meeting set the agenda for the academic year. Most importantly, the 2nd annual academic retreat was a huge success for BLSA, Boyd, and several law schools from around the nation.

“The retreat was a great way to meet other law students from all over the country. I made lasting connections from Washington all the way to Baltimore, Maryland. We learned, laughed, and lived life the Vegas way. You could not ask for a better time,” says Reginald Thomas, Vice President of Social Events and Community Outreach for the Black Law Students Association at UNLV.

BLSA has demonstrated a clear commitment to academic excellence and community involvement. This commitment was demonstrated when BLSA hosted the Second Annual Western Region Black Law Students Association Academic Retreat on October 3 and 4. The retreat was comprised of nine law schools from the Western Region that participated in the “Rock the Vote” Education Day, panel discussions with some of Las Vegas’s most distinguished leaders, and the second installment of the “One House” Town Hall Meeting.

The purpose of the “Rock the Vote” Education Day was to connect black law students from across the United States with students at the Andre Agassi College Preparatory Academy. The law students were thrilled at the opportunity to meet with students to discuss law school, careers in the legal field, and the importance of academic achievement. In turn, the students were curious, engaging, and enthusiastic about their future prospects.

“Serving the community is powerful and rewarding. It is particularly powerful when law students can be an example of academic achievement for younger students who can relate to them,” commented Scott Morris, President of the Black Law Students Association at UNLV.

Upon completion of the “Rock the Vote” Education Day, the law students attended panel discussions with prominent African American attorneys, judges and educators within the community. These prominent leaders discussed many topics including academic success, networking, and finance management.

“As we matriculate through law school, it is always great to receive advice and knowledge from the valley’s most prominent figures. These close-knit connections help produce more leaders in the community,” recounts Crislove Igeleke, Vice President of Operations and Philanthropy for the Black Law Students Association at UNLV.

The culminating event was the second installment of the “One House” town hall. This event was a call to action for many leaders within the Las Vegas valley and beyond. The first “One House” town hall began as a response to the tragedy in Ferguson, Missouri. The purpose of the town hall was to foster dialogue with key stakeholders in our communities, promote equality and justice, and empower the community.

The town hall discussion focused on various topics such as community-based policing, training to reduce unconscious bias, increasing diversity on the police force, how to file a complaint with law enforcement, restoration of voting rights, and other ways to make social change. Deputy Attorney General Kali Fox-Miller moderated the forum, and panelists included Professor Rachel Anderson of the William S. Boyd School of Law, the Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada (PLAN), and the National Black Law Students Association. After the town hall, BLSA advisor Professor Anderson praised BLSA's dedication and successful contributions to transformative change. "The 'One House' town hall has achieved a new level of community engagement and empowerment. BLSA's dedication to advocate for and serve communities that need it most is exemplary and shines a light on a path toward a brighter future."


The 2014-15 BLSA Officers are: Scott Morris, President; Crislove Igeleke, Vice President – Operations and Philanthropy; Reginald Thomas, Vice President – Social Events and Community Outreach; Tasha Schwikert, Treasurer; and Loline-Marie Djidade, Secretary. 

Monday, October 20, 2014

Professors Mary LaFrance and Marketa Trimble to Attend Third Annual US-China IP Conference

(From left) Professors Mary LaFrance and Marketa Trimble
Mary LaFrance is the IGT Professor of Intellectual Property Law at the UNLV William S. Boyd School of Law.

Marketa Trimble is an associate professor of law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

Both will attend the the Third Annual US-China IP Conference at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles on Nov 7.

Professor LaFrance will gave a presentation on "The Future of Performers' Rights."

Professor Trimble will speak on cross-border enforcement of intellectual property rights.

Professor Francine Lipman to Present at Class Crits VII Poverty, Precarity, and Work Conference

Francine J. Lipman is a William S. Boyd Professor of Law at UNLV.

Professor Lipman will attend the Class Crits VII Poverty, Precarity, and Work Conference at UC Davis on Nov. 14.

She will present her paper, "Deconstructing Poverty."

Professor Lipman has written extensively on tax and accounting issues for legal journals, including the Wisconsin Law Review, Florida Tax Review, Virginia Tax Review, Nevada Law Journal, American University Law Review, Harvard Environmental Law Review, Harvard Latino Law Review, Harvard Journal on Legislation, The Tax Lawyer, The Practical Tax Lawyer, Taxes and Tax Notes.

Professor Ann McGinley to Present at Forum on the Future of Law and Inequality

Ann McGinley is a William S. Boyd Professor of Law at UNLV.

On Nov. 7, Professor McGinley will attend the Forum on the Future of Law and Inequality at Tulane Law School in New Orleans.

She'll present a paper titled, "We Are All Contingent: Enhancing Vulnerability in the Workplace.

Professor McGinley is an internationally recognized scholar in the area of employment law, employment discrimination and disability law and a leader in Multidimensional Masculinities Theory, an emerging discipline that applies masculinities theory from social sciences to legal interpretation.

Professors Stacey Tovino and Sara Gordon to Present at Utah Law Review Symposium

(From left) Professors Stacey Tovino and Sara Gordon
Stacey Tovino is the Lincy Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

Sara Gordon is an associate professor of law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Nov. 7, both professors will travel to Salt Lake City to attend a symposium sponsored by the Utah Law Review titled, "Legal Borders and Mental Disorders: The Challenge of Defining Mental Illness."

Professor Tovino will present a paper on the implications of the American Psychiatric Association's DSM-5 on a variety of civil and regulatory health law issues, including health insurance law, disability benefit law, and disability discrimination law.

Professor Gordon will present her paper titled, "The Use of Assisted Outpatient Treatment to Decrease Mental Health Disparities."

Dean Ngai Pindell and UNLV Gaming Law Journal Faculty Advisor Anthony Cabot Featured in VEGAS INC

Ngai Pindell is Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

Anthony Cabot is a partner in the Gaming Law group at Lewis Roca Rothgerber and a faculty advisor for the UNLV Gaming Law Journal.

Both were featured in VEGAS INC’s “People on the Move: Oct 19-25” article, which mentioned their recently edited comprehensive guide to international gaming regulation titled Regulating Land-Based Casinos: Policies, Procedures, and Economics.

The book examines multiple facets of gaming law regulation, including the role of government and public support for gaming tax revenue.

Associate Dean Pindell's research interests are in economic development and housing, and he teaches Property, Land Use Regulation, Local Government Law and Wills, Trusts & Estates.

Provost John Valery White and Boyd Alumnus Tom Wilczek Quoted in Las Vegas Sun

(From left) Provost John Valery White and Boyd alumnus Tom Wilczek
John Valery White is the Executive Vice President and Provost for UNLV and a Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

Boyd alumnus Tom Wilczek ‘01 is an aerospace and defense specialist with the Governor’s Office of Economic Development.

Both were recently quoted in the Las Vegas Sun article titled, "Experts, enthusiasts weigh in on evolving drone landscape," after speaking on a panel during Boyd’s unmanned aerial systems symposium on Oct. 16.

In regard to enforcing federal aviation regulations, Provost White stated, “Imagine a free-for-all on the Strip, if everybody brings their UAS so that they can cruise the Strip without physically cruising it … That’s the sort of thing that will prompt the commission to pass a regulation. Part of the difficulty we have in Nevada, of course, is the absence of an intermediate appellate court.”

While commenting on the use of drones in the media, Wilczek noted, “The question is how do we ensure that media, which has shown a desire to technologically advance and take this industry and technology and mature it, is allowed to continue to use that technology?”

Professor Jeffrey Stempel Quoted in Las Vegas Review-Journal

Jeffrey Stempel is the Doris S. and Theodore B. Lee Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

Professor Stempel was quoted in an Oct. 18 article by the Las Vegas Review-Journal titled, "Vegas prosecutors used ‘super seal’ to hide fortune seized from gamblers."

In the article, he mentioned the potential risks of sealing court records. Professor Stempel stated, "Excessive use of sealing undermines public confidence in the courts, and I think it creates a danger of bad decision-making when there isn’t enough scrutiny."

Professor Stempel has numerous publications to his credit, including books, treatise chapters and supplements, and law review articles. He is a 1981 graduate of Yale Law School, where he was an editor of the Yale Law Journal and co-founder of the Yale Law and Policy Review.

Boyd Student Caitlin Lorreli Featured in Nevada Business Article

Boyd student Caitlin Lorreli was mentioned in an Oct. 16 article by Nevada Business titled, “Colliers International – Vegas Expands Local Team."

Colliers International, a real estate service firm, recently hired Caitlin as an administrative assistant.

Before attending Boyd, Caitlin obtained a Nevada real estate license and later worked in commercial real estate.

Friday, October 17, 2014

Professor Ian Bartrum Quoted in Las Vegas Sun

Ian Bartrum is an Associate Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

Professor Bartrum recently spoke to the Las Vegas Sun about the same-sex marriage ban and the Coalition for the Protection of Marriage group’s request for a rehearing in an Oct. 13 article titled "Group trying to revive Nevada's same-sex marriage ban."

In the article, Professor Bartrum stated “… a rehearing by the full 9th Circuit Court of Appeals would require a majority vote of nonrecused, active judges… The number of judges who are recused may have an effect on the outcome of the rehearing vote.” In the end, however, Professor Bartrum still believed “the full appeals court will likely agree with last week’s decision.”

Professor Bartrum's research interests are in constitutional history and theory, the Establishment Clause, and constitutional education.

Oct. 16 Boyd Briefs Now Available

The Oct. 16 edition of Boyd Briefs is now available.

This week's edition features Professor Elizabeth MacDowell, student Ryan Reynolds, and alumna Evie Lee Nichols '06.

Professor MacDowell curently serves as the director of Boyd's Family Justice Clinic. She is also a Bellow Scholar, a distinction that recognizes especially deserving law school faculty members who are involved in anti-poverty work or increasing access to justice.

Reynolds is a second-year student at Boyd. Before attending law school, he had an exceptional football career at Bishop Gorman High School and the University of Oklahoma.

Nichols is assistant general counsel at International Medical Corps in its Washington, D.C. office. Her varied litigation background and government contracts experience allow her to handle the variety of legal issues that impact the nonprofit organization.

To subscribe to Boyd Briefs, visit law.unlv.edu/BoydBriefs.

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Boyd Student Ashleigh Wise Writes About Alternative Dispute Resolution Process Used by IRS

By Ashleigh Wise, Student Fellow, Saltman Center for Conflict Resolution

We’ve all seen those commercials claiming to save you thousands of dollars while wiping out your tax debt. But are those commercials truthful and not just a scam to get your money? It depends.

The IRS informally uses many methods of alternative dispute resolution (ADR). But the IRS also has distinct forms of ADR. The offer-in-compromise (OIC) is one of those methods. An OIC is an agreement between the taxpayer and the IRS to settle a tax debt for less than the full amount owed. An OIC is the preferred method for the tax firms claiming to resolve your tax debt.

Any taxpayer can submit an OIC, but few are eligible. If a person can pay their entire liability through a lump sum or installment agreement, then the IRS, protecting the government’s financial resources, will not accept a reduction in a taxpayer’s debts. A taxpayer who has no possible way of paying off their tax debt would be a good candidate for an OIC.

An OIC depends upon a taxpayer’s financial profile supported by third-party financial documents and a mathematical formula for determining the amount that the taxpayer will be required to pay. For an OIC to be accepted, a person must submit a completed Form 656, copies of tax returns for disputed years, and a personal narrative explaining either why a) there is a doubt to collectability, b) doubt to liability, or c) it would be unfair to collect the entire debt amount. The taxpayer then sends the completed packet to the IRS, who either accepts or rejects the offer.

An accepted OIC is a binding contract between the taxpayer and the IRS. The taxpayer must make the payments they offered to make while also filing and timely paying their taxes for the next five years. Taxpayers are barred from contesting the amount of the tax debt in court. Furthermore, the taxpayer is still liable for the deficiency, penalties, and interest until they have paid the entire amount of the agreed amount.

Submitting an OIC is a complicated process with many rules and stipulations attached. Do not get fooled by the easy settle your debt tax commercials. Taxpayers with the financial resources to pay their tax liabilities are not eligible for an OIC. However, for those that qualify, an OIC can be an effective tool for a fresh start and permanent relief from crippling tax debt.

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Boyd School of Law Hosts Society of American Law Teachers 2014 Conference

http://us7.campaign-archive1.com/?u=bb6cea7ee89de64cd84564715&id=a61c5a891a
On Oct. 10 and 11, the UNLV William S. Boyd School of Law hosted the Society of American Law Teachers (SALT) 2014 Teaching Conference.

SALT Co-Presidents Ruben Garcia of the Boyd School of Law and Olympia Duhart of Nova Southeastern University, Shepard Broad Law Center wrote a thank you email to conference participants. To view the email, which highlights the many activities that took place during the conference, click here.

SALT -- a community of progressive law teachers, law school administrators, librarians, academic support experts, students and affiliates -- has worked for more than 40 years to improve the legal profession, the law academy, and expand the power of law to underserved communities.

Boyd Alumni and Adjunct Professors Named to Top Lawyers List

Forty-one William S. Boyd School of Law alumni and two adjunct professors were recently named top lawyers in Southern Nevada.

Editors of the October issue of Desert Companion magazine worked with Seattle-based Avvo, a company that rates attorneys nationwide, to compile a list of 346 leading lawyers in Southern Nevada. The article reads, “Avvo’s proprietary algorithm rates all attorneys on a 10-point scale, factoring in peer endorsements as well as experience, education, training, speaking, publishing and awards. These dynamic ratings are continuously refreshed based on new information gleaned from attorneys, as well as from licensing and disciplinary authorities.”

Desert Companion’s top lawyers list identified a number of Boyd alumni and adjunct professors, including the following:

Alumni 
Paola Armeni ‘03
Christian Balducci ‘12
Brian Blackham ‘05
Koren Boyd ‘11
Shemilly Briscoe ‘06
Nicholas Crosby ‘04
Nadin Cutter ‘08
Laura Deeter ‘07
William Devine ‘07
Andrew Dixon ‘03
Christopher Ford ‘09
Matthew Friedman ‘09
Puneet Garg ‘05
Nedda Ghandi ‘08
Joshua Gilmore ‘09
Brian Hardy ‘06
Dale Hayes ‘04
Lawrence Hill ‘09
F. James ‘06
Christopher Jones ‘04
Michael Lee ‘06
Joel Mann ‘02
Joseph Maridon ‘03
Terry Moore ‘01
Linda Norcross ‘04
Montgomery Paek ‘06
Anthony Paglia ‘08
Xenophon Peters ‘07
Keith Pickard ‘11
Becky Pintar ‘01
Cal Potter ‘12
Charles Rainey ‘07
Molly Rosenblum ‘02
Eric Roy ‘09
Kelly Stout ‘10
William Sykes ‘05
Sandy Van ‘07
Melissa Waite ‘07
Homa Woodrum ‘07
Anthony Wright ‘04
Heather Zana ‘02

Adjunct Professors 
Gregory Gemignani
Jennifer Roberts

Professor Nancy Rapoport to Participate in Annual Bankruptcy Ethics Symposium

Nancy B. Rapoport is the Gordon Silver Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

Professor Rapoport will attend the 11th Annual Bankruptcy Ethics Symposium on Nov. 21 in Los Angeles. She will give a presentation titled “A Ethics Conversation with Professor Nancy B. Rapoport.” 

The event is sponsored by the Los Angeles Federal Bar Association, one of the oldest and largest chapters of the national Federal Bar Association.

Professor Rapoport's specialties are bankruptcy ethics, ethics in governance, and the depiction of lawyers in popular culture.  

Monday, October 13, 2014

Professor Mary LaFrance Presents at Third Annual Trademark Works-in-Progress Colloquium

Mary LaFrance is the IGT Professor of Intellectual Property Law at the UNLV William S. Boyd School of Law.

From Oct. 10 to 11, Professor LaFrance attended the Third Annual Trademark Works-in-Progress Colloquium at American University’s Washington College of Law in Washington, D.C.

She presented a paper titled, “False Advertising Claims Against Product Names and Labels.”

Professor LaFrance’s teaching and research interests include domestic and international intellectual property law, as well as the taxation of intellectual property.

Professor Ian Bartrum Appears on Live And Local With Kevin Wall

Professor Ian Bartrum teaches at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Oct. 8, he appeared on KXNT's Live And Local With Kevin Wall to talk about the Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriages in Nevada.

"My guess is that what Clark County is holding out for now is to see what happens with this petition from the coalition for the protection of marriage, this private group. They're trying to see if they can get a stay in Nevada even though the Nevada government won't file an appeal. They're just waiting to see if the Court is sympathetic to that petition. I anticipate that they will not be. And then it'll be totally cleared up and I would think that then Clark County would start issuing licenses, but that may be a day or two down the road," he said during the segment.

Professor Bartrum's research interests are in constitutional history and theory, the Establishment Clause, and constitutional education.

Friday, October 10, 2014

Dean Dan Hamilton Featured in David Magazine

Dan Hamilton is the Dean and Richard J. Morgan Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

Dean Hamilton is featured in the October issue of David Magazine in an article titled "Las Vegas Law."

The article reads, "Although he has been drinking from the proverbial firehose since arriving, Hamilton embraces the often frenzied pace he maintains as Boyd dean. 'The challenge is you need to be out in the community, meeting with law firms, alumni, potential employers, friends,' he says. 'And you need to be working inside the building to help think about curriculum and things like enrollment management. Every day I try to do both.'"

Dean Hamilton researches and writes primarily on American property ideology and the legal and constitutional issues raised by the Civil War. He has written numerous articles and reviews on American legal history.

Boyd Alumna Kelly Dove ’07 Interviewed by FOX5

On Oct. 6, Boyd alumna and Snell & Wilmer attorney Kelly Dove ’07 was interviewed by FOX5 KVVU-TV on the issue of same-sex marriage.

In the article titled “Same-sex battle in Nevada continues,” Dove speaks about her surprise that the Supreme Court decided not to rule on the issue of same-sex marriage.

“I think the conventional thought was that the Supreme Court was going to at least hear one or two cases this term,” she said.

Dove helped argue for same-sex marriage at the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.

Professor Jeffrey Stempel Interviewed on 8 News Now

Jeffrey Stempel is the Doris S. and Theodore B. Lee Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Oct. 7, Professor Stempel was interviewed by 8 News Now as part of an I-Team investigation into problems that judges and lawyers have with the current judicial election system. The investigation found, through public campaign finance reports, that lawyers and law firms contribute thousands of dollars to candidates, many of whom are deciding their cases.

In a segment titled "I-Team: Bulk of money in judge races from lawyers, law firms," Professor Stempel shared his views about the issue (1:18 mark).

"I think mostly, it's a perception problem. I don't think we have a significant problem with (outright) fraud, or conscious favoritism. What I think we have a problem with is clearly perception that justice could be for sale, for the people who contribute," he said.

Professor Stempel has numerous publications to his credit, including books, treatise chapters and supplements, and law review articles. He is a 1981 graduate of Yale Law School, where he was an editor of the Yale Law Journal and co-founder of the Yale Law and Policy Review.

Professor Michael Kagan Quoted in IRIN

Professor Michael Kagan is co-director of the Immigration Clinic at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Oct. 7, Professor Kagan was quoted in an Integrated Regional Information Networks (IRIN) article titled, "Alternatives to refugee camps: Can policy become practice?” IRIN is a service of the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs and offers readers humanitarian news and analysis.

In the article, which discusses a new policy to actively pursue alternatives to refugee camps whenever possible, Professor Kagan describes the alternatives as encouraging but “still aspirational.”

“The missing link is to explain how host governments can be persuaded to let refugees have more autonomy,” he stated.

Professor Kagan has written several of the most widely cited articles in the fields of refugee and asylum law. His research on credibility assessment in asylum cases has been repeatedly relied on by federal appellate courts and, according to a 2012 commentary, has "guided most subsequent research and analysis on the topic."

Professor Marketa Trimble Places Two Articles

Marketa Trimble is a Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.
Professor Trimble has two forthcoming articles.

Her latest article, titled “The Territoriality Referendum,” is now available for download on the Social Science Research Network. The article is forthcoming in the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) Journal. In the abstract, Professor Trimble writes, “Many Internet users have encountered geoblocking tools – tools that prevent users from accessing certain content on the Internet based on the location from which the users are connecting to the Internet. Because at least some users want to access such content, they turn to tools that enable them to evade geoblocking, to appear on the Internet as if they were located in another location, and to access the content that is available in this other location.”

In addition, a hardcopy publication of Professor Trimble’s article titled “The Marrakesh Puzzle” is forthcoming. The article, which analyzes the challenges of implementing the 2013 WIPO Marrakesh Treaty, was published online Sept. 26.

In her research, Professor Trimble focuses on intellectual property and issues at the intersection of intellectual property and private international law/conflict of laws.

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Boyd Student Maria Michelle Nisce Writes About Casino Bankruptcies

Boyd School of Law student Maria Michelle Nisce's article recently appeared in the American Bankruptcy Institute's Ethics and Professional Compensation newsletter.

The article is titled, "Casino Bankruptcies: Thinking Outside the 'Typical Chapter 11' Box."

In it, she writes, "Casino bankruptcies are unlike the typical chapter 11 proceedings because the courts must find a balance between the competing interests of federal bankruptcy laws and state gaming laws. The Bankruptcy Code ensures that creditors are paid and that the debtor remains in business so that it can continue contributing to the economy. The goal of the state gaming regulations include preventing unsuitable persons from having involvement in the gaming industry, establishing and maintaining responsible accounting procedures and financial practices, preventing fraudulent practices, and creating state and local sources of revenues. In exercising their overlapping powers to ensure that their goals are met, the bankruptcy courts and Gaming Control Board affect both the casino operations and the bankruptcy filing procedures."

Professor Michael Kagan Quoted in The Guardian

Professor Michael Kagan is co-director of the Immigration Clinic at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Oct. 7, Professor Kagan was quoted in The Guardian's article, "Syria's civil war has forced 3m refugees to flee the country - why is the US accepting so few?"

The article reads, "Michael Kagan, an expert in international refugee law at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, said there are serious ethical concerns, not to mention administrative hurdles, to consider when deciding which of the refugees to accept. 'These programmes are often looking for the vulnerable of the vulnerable,' Kagan said, a category that can include unaccompanied children, medical cases, at-risk women, and victims of torture. Kagan said it will take an 'incredible' administrative apparatus to screen every refugee, and even then, there will be ethical concerns about how the decisions are made."

Professor Kagan has written several of the most widely cited articles in the fields of refugee and asylum law. His research on credibility assessment in asylum cases has been repeatedly relied on by federal appellate courts and, according to a 2012 commentary, has "guided most subsequent research and analysis on the topic."

Oct. 9 Boyd Briefs Now Available

The Oct. 9 edition of Boyd Briefs is now available.

This week's edition features Professor Jean Sternlight, student Jessica Gandy, and alumnus William Horne '01.

Professor Sternlight is the Director of the Saltman Center for Conflict Resolution. In addition to being an invaluable leader of the law school community, she's among the most highly respected and most frequently cited scholars of alternative dispute resolution in the country.

Jessica is a third-year, part-time evening student at Boyd. She currently serves as the president of Boyd's Organization of Part-Time and Non-Traditional Law students, and is also the vice president of Legally Speaking, the law school's Toastmasters chapter.

William is currently completing his term as Assembly Majority Leader.  To continue his career in public service, he is seeking election as a judge for Clark County District Court, Department 5.

To subscribe to Boyd Briefs, visit law.unlv.edu/BoydBriefs.

Professor Michael Kagan Calls for More Objective Approach to Refugee Credibility Assessment

Professor Michael Kagan spent two days in Yerevan, Armenia, training asylum adjudicators from Armenia, Georgia and Moldova on the art of credibility assessment in refugee cases.

Asylum cases around the world are decided based on an international definition of a refugee that requires a person to prove that they have a "well-founded fear of being persecuted," the same basic criteria that is used when people seek asylum in the United States. But because people who escape from persecution rarely can bring definitive independent evidence with them, their cases typically depend on the credibility of the applicant's own testimony.

Historically, adjudicators often used instinct and subjective impressions to decide asylum cases, relying on people's tone of voice, whether they made eye contact, and other nonverbal communication. But such decision-making has been shown by research to be inconsistent, unreliable and dangerous. Even in the best of circumstances, most people cannot discern whether another person is telling the truth based on demeanor alone, and it is especially difficult with a person from another culture who is naturally nervous and may be suffering from the effects of trauma or may simply be overwhelmed by anxiety.

In 2003, Professor Kagan published a groundbreaking article in the Georgetown Immigration Law Journal calling for a more objective approach to refugee credibility assessment, which became the basis for a new approach grounded in social science and a more careful analytical method. He followed this in 2010 with a study of credibility assessment in asylum cases based on religious persecution. Last year, Professor Kagan co-authored a state-of-the-art training manual on refugee credibility assessment for use in Europe.

Co-taught by Gabor Gyulai of the Hungarian Helsinki Committee, the training in Armenia was part of a United Nations initiative to assist emerging asylum systems in Eastern Europe. Countries like Armenia have been seeing increasing numbers of asylum claims as a result of the war in Syria and continuing human rights violations in Iran.

"Not long ago, credibility would have been just an hour out of longer course on refugee law, if that, even though it ends up deciding the majority of cases," Professor Kagan said. "It's a great thing to be able to go into credibility in so much depth, and with an impressive group of adjudicators in a region bordering so much turmoil."

At Boyd, Professor Kagan co-directs the Immigration Clinic, which represents asylum-seekers in the American asylum system. Before coming to UNLV, Professor Kagan spent a decade developing legal aid programs for refugees in the Middle East, Asia and Africa.

"The issues our students have to master to represent our clients here are essentially the same as the issues that come up in Moldova or Georgia," Professor Kagan said. "And if we win a case here, it can end up influencing an asylum system on the other side of the world.”

Boyd Alumna Lisa Lynn Chapman ’07 Featured on KSNV News 3

On Oct. 7, Boyd alumna Lisa Lynn Chapman ’07, director of community relations at Safe Nest, was featured in a report on domestic violence on KSNV News 3.

In a segment titled Man accused of abusing toddler has history of domestic violence (1:05-minute remaining mark), Lisa spoke on behalf of Safe Nest, a domestic violence crisis center, about the nature of violent relationships.

"Often times, people who are in violent relationships have said it's always been okay while it was just me, but as soon as he hit my children or started focusing in on the children I knew I had to leave for their sake," she said during the interview.

Boyd Alumna Lucy Flores '10 on KNPR’s State of Nevada

On Oct. 3, Boyd alumna Lucy Flores ’10 spoke on KNPR’s State of Nevada about her promise to focus on schools and support education if she is elected Nevada’s lieutenant governor. The podcast is available here.


Monday, October 6, 2014

Career Development Director Layke Stolberg to Attend ABA Conference

Layke Stolberg is the Director of Career Development.

From Oct. 9 to 11, Stolberg will attend the ABA Young Lawyers Division Fall Conference in Portland, Ore.

Stolberg is attending the conference on behalf of the State Bar of Nevada’s Young Lawyers Section. She is currently the Chair-Elect of the Young Lawyers Section and has served on the Executive Council since 2010. The Young Lawyers Section has more than 600 members.

Associate Director Rachael Adair to Attend Career Strategies Conference

From Oct. 8-11, Rachael Adair will attend the Corporate Counsel Women of Color's (CCWC) 10th Annual Career Strategies Conference in Los Angeles, as the CCWC organization celebrates 10 years of diversity in the law. In-house counsel, federal judges, and others in the legal industry will be featured speakers, addressing various career-related issues, such as law department trends, strategies for transitioning from one legal position to the next, mentoring law students, and career lessons learned.

Adair plans to return from the conference with information and relationships which can benefit Boyd students and alumni as they navigate their legal careers.

Adair is the new associate director of Career Development and judicial clerkship coordinator at the Boyd School of Law. A practicing attorney for the past 10 years, Rachael recently joined the Career Development Office.

Professor Leslie Griffin Writes About Opening of Supreme Court Term

Dr. Leslie C. Griffin is a William S. Boyd Professor of Law at UNLV.

On Hamilton and Griffin on Rights, a blog co-written by Professor Griffin, she has recently written about the opening of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2014 term.

On Sept. 29, Professor Griffin authored a blog entry about the "Top Ten Supreme Court Cases Hamilton and Griffin on Rights are Following this Term."

In the Welcome: The Supreme Court's 2014 Terms Begins blog entry, Professor Griffin writes, "What could be more ridiculous than letting a prisoner tell prison officials how long his beard should be? How about letting a model tell her employers what clothes she should wear to promote their brand? Welcome to the Supreme Court’s 2014 Term, which starts today, October 6. The Court will deal with those two scenarios, and many more ... "

Professor Griffin, who teaches constitutional law, is known for her interdisciplinary work in law and religion.

Friday, October 3, 2014

Boyd Student James Bolotin Writes Paper Accepted for Publication

William S. Boyd School of Law third-year student James Bolotin recently accepted an offer of publication from the University of Tennessee College of Law for a paper he wrote titled “Cracks in the Shield: The Necessity of the Employment Non-Discrimination Act.”

Bolotin’s paper is expected to appear in the spring 2015 edition of the college’s Tennessee Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice.

Congratulations, James! 

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Oct. 2 Edition of Boyd Briefs Now Available

The Oct. 2 edition of Boyd Briefs is now available.

This week's edition features Professor Lori Johnson, student Kostan Lathouris, and alumna Christal Dixon '02.

Professor Johnson teaches legal writing and research, transactional drafting, and professional responsibility. She also teaches in Boyd's nationally recognized Lawyering Process Program.

This past summer, Lathouris worked as an intern for the Division of Indian Affairs at the United States Department of Interior, Office of the Solicitor. In addition to working though his final year at Boyd, he currently serves as the commission chairman of the Chemehuevi Tribal Gaming Commission.

Dixon is the Central Team Chief at the Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada's Children's Attorneys Project. While at Boyd, she was a founding member of the Public Interest Law Association and Minority Law Association.

To subscribe to Boyd Briefs, visit law.unlv.edu/BoydBriefs.

Professor Michael Kagan Quoted in Las Vegas Review-Journal

Professor Michael Kagan is co-director of the Immigration Clinic at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On Sept. 24, Professor Kagan spoke about the impact of the backlog of immigration cases in a Las Vegas Review-Journal article titled “Immigration Cases Delayed by Backlog.”

“It’s bad for valid cases, it’s bad for the Department of Homeland Security if they want to move cases more quickly, and it’s not good for the court that’s overwhelmed beyond its capacity,” he said in the article.

Professor Kagan has written several of the most widely cited articles in the fields of refugee and asylum law. His research on credibility assessment in asylum cases has been repeatedly relied on by federal appellate courts and, according to a 2012 commentary, has "guided most subsequent research and analysis on the topic."

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Women Leaders Visit Boyd School of Law, Meet with Faculty

Women dignitaries visit the Boyd School of Law on Sept. 22. Boyd faculty members pictured above
include: Fatma Marouf, Ann McGinley, Elizabeth MacDowell, Leslie Griffin, and Stacey Tovino.

A group of women foreign dignitaries from around the globe on Sept. 22 visited the William S. Boyd School of Law to meet with members of the Boyd community as part of a multi-regional project titled “Women Leaders: Promoting Peace and Security.”

Invited to the U.S. under the auspices of the U.S. Department of State’s International Visitor Leadership Program (IVLP), the visit was arranged by the World Affairs Council of Las Vegas to promote citizen diplomacy, learn about support for women leaders, and engage the Las Vegas community. The Boyd School of Law was one stop on the Las Vegas tour, which included visits to the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, Aid for Aids of Nevada, and Congress of Racial Equality, among others.

Participating in the cultural exchange were several Boyd faculty members. The group discussed the challenges that women in the U.S. faced in terms of gender discrimination, and the legal protections that now exist to promote equality in employment and other sectors.

IVLP participants are selected by U.S. embassies to travel to the U.S. to meet and confer with their professional counterparts. The women dignitaries represented 14 different countries, including Azerbaijan, Burma, Cyprus, Egypt, Ghana, Hungary, India, Iraq, Kenya, Macedonia, Philippines, South Africa, Republic of South Sudan, and Suriname.