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Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Professor Nancy Rapoport Invited to Serve on The Business Lawyer's Editorial Board

Nancy B. Rapoport is the Gordon Silver Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

Professor Rapoport was recently invited to join the editorial board of The Business Lawyer, a quarterly business law journal circulated to some 60,000 readers in the country. The Business Lawyer focuses on articles of interest to business lawyers, including developing trends and case law analysis.

During her one-year term as a member of the editorial board, Professor Rapoport will review articles submitted for publication, provide advice in connection with the journal, meet with other members of the editorial board at the American Bar Association's Business Law Section Spring Meeting, and more.

Professor Rapoport's specialties are bankruptcy ethics, ethics in governance, and the depiction of lawyers in popular culture.  

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Professor Ruben Garcia to Present at 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Bar Association

Ruben J. Garcia is a Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

Professor Garcia will attend the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Bar Association (ABA) in Boston on Aug. 8.

He will present the Affiliate Report of the Society of American Law Teachers (SALT) to the Council of the ABA Section on Legal Education and Admission to the Bar in his capacity as Co-President of SALT.

A recognized expert in the field of labor and employment law, Professor Garcia teaches Labor Law, Employment Law, Constitutional Law, and Professional Responsibility at the Boyd School of Law. He has been quoted in the Los Angeles Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Las Vegas Review-Journal, among others, and has appeared on national and local radio and television programs.

Professor Nancy Rapoport's Paper Makes Top 10 Download List

Nancy B. Rapoport is the Gordon Silver Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

Professor Rapoport's paper, "'Nudging' Better Lawyer Behavior: Using Default Rules and Incentives to Change Behavior in Law Firms," recently made the Social Science Research Network's top 10 downloads list for the topic area of Law Firms/Legal Practice. The article was published in the St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics, Volume 4.

The abstract reads, "This article examines how incentives in law firms can affect lawyer behavior and suggests some possible changes to incentive structures and default rules that might improve the ethical behavior of lawyers. In the changing landscape of law practice — where law firm profits are threatened by such changes as increased pressure from clients to economize and the concomitant opportunities for clients to shop around for the most efficient lawyers — are there ways to change how things are done in law firms so that firms can provide more efficient and ethical service? This article suggests that an understanding of cognitive biases and basic behavioral economics will help law firms tweak their incentives and default rules to promote the improved delivery of legal services."

Professor Rapoport's specialties are bankruptcy ethics, ethics in governance, and the depiction of lawyers in popular culture.  

Monday, July 28, 2014

Professor Nancy Rapoport's Article Cited by Judge Mark Bennett

Nancy B. Rapoport is the Gordon Silver Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

Her article "Where Have All the (Legal) Stories Gone?" from the Fall 2009 issue of the Association of Media & Entertainment Counsel's M/E Insights, was cited by The Honorable Mark W. Bennett of the United States District Court in the Northern District of Iowa. Judge Bennett cited Professor Rapoport's work in his article "Eight Traits of Great Trial Lawyers: A Federal Judge's View on How to Shed the Moniker 'I Am a Litigator,'" published in the University of Texas School of Law's The Review of Litigation Winter 2014 issue.

Judge Bennett's article reads, "Is the legal academy to blame for poor storytelling skills among lawyers? While criticism of legal education is certainly reaching a modern-day zenith, it would be unfair to place too much of the blame on the education system, since '[n]arrative theory and storytelling have emerged as threads in legal scholarship steadily over the past 20 years.' Regardless, I have never heard any judge comment that lawyers are improving in the art of storytelling. Why is this? Perhaps Professor Nancy Rapoport described it best: Few law professors stay in touch with the practice of law [and, as a result, w] e just don’t have much credibility when it comes to telling students how lawyers work, or what good lawyers need to know, because few of us stayed long enough in the practice of law to have been considered good lawyers."

Professor Rapoport's specialties are bankruptcy ethics, ethics in governance, and the depiction of lawyers in popular culture.  

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Professor Mary LaFrance Featured on 8 News NOW

Mary LaFrance is the IGT Professor of Intellectual Property Law at the UNLV William S. Boyd School of Law.

On July 18, she was featured in the 8 News NOW segment I Team: Las Vegas businessman victim of trademark bullying.

The segment is about Las Vegas businessman Don Rubenstein, who sells Farmer Brothers' products online under the company name Easycoffee. Rubenstein recently received a letter from a law firm representing British airliner easyJet, threatening to sue if the word "easy" isn't dropped from the name "Easycoffee."

"This will strengthen their case when they want to go after a bigger target that can afford to defend itself," Professor LaFrance said during the interview. "Such as E-Z Rental car."

Professor LaFrance’s teaching and research interests include domestic and international intellectual property law, as well as the taxation of intellectual property.

Friday, July 18, 2014

Professors Mary LaFrance, Marketa Trimble to Present at Intellectual Property Scholars Conference

(l-r) Professors Mary LaFrance and Marketa Trimble
Mary LaFrance is the IGT Professor of Intellectual Property Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law. 

Marketa Trimble is an Associate Professor of Law at the Boyd School of Law.

On Aug. 7 and 8, Professors LaFrance and Trimble will attend the Intellectual Property Scholars Conference at the UC Berkeley School of Law. There, they will present new papers.

The conference brings together intellectual property scholars to present their works-in-progress.

Professor LaFrance’s teaching and research interests include domestic and international intellectual property law, as well as the taxation of intellectual property.

In her research, Professor Trimble focuses on intellectual property and issues at the intersection of intellectual property and private international law/conflict of laws.

Professor Nancy Rapoport to Present at Eighth Circuit Judicial Conference

Nancy B. Rapoport is the Gordon Silver Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

At the beginning of August, Professor Rapoport will participate in the 2014 Eighth Circuit Judicial Conference in Omaha, Neb. She will speak on bankruptcy ethics.

Professor Rapoport's specialties are bankruptcy ethics, ethics in governance, and the depiction of lawyers in popular culture.  

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Dean Daniel Hamilton, Boyd Alumni Write for Nevada Lawyer July Issue

Dean Daniel Hamilton and several Boyd alumni are featured in the July issue of Nevada Lawyer, the State Bar of Nevada's monthly magazine.

Dean Hamilton authored the Dean's Column, titled "Natural Resources Law at UNLV and Beyond." In it, he wrote, "At the law school, our mission is to educate our students to navigate the complex landscape of natural resources law and policy, at the local, regional and national levels. We are committed to generating discussion and knowledge, so that our students and the community can solve problems and innovate on these important issues."

Alumnus Matthew Christian '02 wrote a letter to the editor. In his letter, he wrote, "Whether you agree or disagree with Mr. Lefebvre’s May column, he must still be praised for using the column for a useful purpose. It is not just 'fluff' that readers skip past on their way to finding out if any of their friends or adversaries have gotten into ethical trouble. The June column on the challenges of private practice is another good example. (It just probably won’t incite letters, even though managing partners of large law firms are likely “offended,” too.) Here’s to using Nevada Lawyer to spur lively debate."

Alumnus Michael Saunders '00 wrote "Distributed Solar Energy in Nevada." The article reads, "Given Nevada’s solar resource potential, falling PV prices, significant increases in electric utility rates that shorten system payback periods, federal and state incentives, and new market entrants, such as SolarCity, offering ways for homeowners to avoid upfront system cost, the future of solar DG in Nevada has the potential to be very bright."

Alumna Kendelee Works '05 wrote "Young Lawyers: In Closing... " In the column, she wrote, "Fortunately, more and more attorneys are recognizing our social responsibility to give back to our communities by providing pro bono legal services. There is an undeniable and overwhelming need for more of us to provide pro bono assistance to those going through unfortunate times. In addition to doing pro bono work, many of our state and local bar organizations also offer opportunities to give back by participating in educational and mentoring programs, charitable drives and day-long community outreach projects, where seniors and veterans can seek guidance regarding estate planning and available benefits."

Alumnus John Zimmerman '05 wrote "Note from the Issue Editor" and co-wrote "Sage-Grouse in the Sagebrush State." In the note, he wrote, "Nevada residents are keenly aware that we live in the driest state in the nation. We also know that much of the land making up our state is owned and controlled by the Federal government. This issue of Nevada Lawyer examines several discrete legal topics that affect the practice of natural resource law in Nevada and which are impacted by the above-mentioned factors."

Boyd School of Law's Free Legal Education Classes Featured in Vegas Seven

The William S. Boyd School of Law's Free Legal Education classes were featured in Vegas Seven on July 16 in an article titled The Sun'll Go Down then Annie, then Annie.

The article reads, "Money troubles got you down? We can't put more green in your jeans, but we can tell you where to go for some solid (and free) legal advice: UNLV's William S. Boyd School of Law, where you'll find classes on bankruptcy every Friday, 3-5 p.m., through Aug. 8. It's part of the summer free legal education series. Check out law.unlv.edu for other times and topics."

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Associate Professor Fatma Marouf Featured on Harvard Immigration & Refugee Clinical Program Blog

Fatma Marouf is the Co-Director of the Immigration Clinic and an Associate Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On July 16, she was featured in the Harvard Immigration & Refugee Clinical Program blog article Alumni Interview with Fatma Marouf.

When asked if her time at Harvard's Immigration & Refugee Clinic influenced her long-term goals, Professor Marouf responded, "The clinic was critical to my professional development. My experiences representing low-income individuals in clinic helped me decide to join California Rural Legal Assistance after graduating. I then decided to practice immigration law in Los Angeles and focused on removal defense. Clinic was also a catalyst for my decision to become a law professor. Debbie (Anker) was a great role model and has been very supportive of my academic career. I joined UNLV in 2010 as an Associate Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Immigration Clinic. The clinic provides representation in removal proceedings, works with survivors of human trafficking, published a report on detention conditions, and has an innovative project with the public defenders’ office that involves providing immigration advice at the front-end of criminal proceedings, before someone is convicted."

Drawing on her extensive experience representing individuals before the Immigration Courts, Board of Immigration Appeals, and U.S. Courts of Appeals, Professor Marouf's research probes various problems involved in adjudicating immigration cases at all levels.

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Professor Leslie Griffin Quoted in National Catholic Reporter

Dr. Leslie C. Griffin is a William S. Boyd Professor of Law at UNLV.

On July 14, she was quoted in the National Catholic Reporter article Hobby Lobby supporters: Case was about owners' individual rights.

"I don't think anyone should forget about the gay rights issues. What about insurance for same-sex partners? The logic of Hobby Lobby says that if you own a restaurant, you can say you don't want my restaurant used for gay marriages. Then why wouldn't you win?" she said in the article. "The argument in the business context has always been that when you decide to become a business, you enter into a different world. The reasons you incorporate in the first place is precisely to get away from your personal identity -- you get certain benefits, but you also lose certain benefits."

Professor Griffin, who teaches constitutional law, is known for her interdisciplinary work in law and religion.

Boyd Alumni Elana Graham '10 and Agnes Lexis (Botelho) '08 Featured in Las Vegas Review-Journal

On July 12, Boyd alumni Elana Graham '10 and Agnes Lexis (Botelho) '08 were featured in the Las Vegas Review-Journal article Las Vegas man found innocent 8 years later.

The article is about Victor Villalta, who was accused of sexually assaulting two girls eight years ago. The day before his trial, which could have led to a life prison term, a key piece of evidence and a polygraph test led to Villalta's case being dismissed.

"In the fall of 2013, two new prosecutors, Agnes Lexis and Elana Graham, took over the case. As the June 24 trial date neared, Lexis and Graham began prepping their case. Wolfson said the two prosecutors were combing through evidence when they discovered case notes from Detective Smith that questioned the validity of the allegations against Villalta," the article reads. "Prosecutors Lexis and Graham immediately contacted (defense attorney) Hart and offered Villalta a new deal: If he passed a polygraph exam, they would move to dismiss the case. He passed the test with ease on June 23. Instead of picking a jury June 24, Judge Adair dismissed the case. Villalta thanked Lexis and Graham for 'doing the right thing and giving me the opportunity to clear my name.'”

Professor Francine Lipman Featured on TaxProf Blog

Francine J. Lipman is a William S. Boyd Professor of Law at UNLV.

On July 14, she was featured in the TaxProf Blog article San Diego Tax Prof Dinner.

Professor Lipman recently organized a dinner with a handful of tax law professors from California. The dinner was in honor of the TaxProf Blog's 10-year anniversary.

Professor Lipman has written extensively on tax and accounting issues for legal journals, including the Wisconsin Law Review, Florida Tax Review, Virginia Tax Review, Nevada Law Journal, American University Law Review, Harvard Environmental Law Review, Harvard Latino Law Review, Harvard Journal on Legislation, The Tax Lawyer, The Practical Tax Lawyer, Taxes and Tax Notes.

Professor Leslie Griffin Quoted in The New York Times

Dr. Leslie C. Griffin is a William S. Boyd Professor of Law at UNLV.

On July 11, she was quoted in The New York Times article Among Justices, Considering a Divide Not of Gender or Politics, but of Beliefs. The article is about the Supreme Court's decisions in Greece v. Galloway and Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, "two cases bearing extensively on the separation of church and state."

“How could Catholics say they are now opposed, that they’re a minority religion, when they’re a majority on the court?” said Professor Griffin in the article. “And now they’re reducing the barrier between church and state in a way that’s comfortable with their values.” 

Professor Griffin, who teaches constitutional law, is known for her interdisciplinary work in law and religion.

Friday, July 11, 2014

Former Adjunct Professor Bob Faiss Featured on KNPR News

Former Adjunct Professor Bob Faiss was featured on KNPR News on July 10 in an article titled "Remembering Bob Faiss."

The article, written by Senator Richard Bryan, reads, "He spent a lot of time at the legislature, and shaped important legislation, including enabling Nevada gaming companies to own casinos outside the state; the first regulations for internet gaming; gaming enterprise districts; and standards requiring applicants to make contributions to their community in which they built. Other jurisdictions brought him in to help set up their regulatory systems, in the U.S. and abroad, and he served on federal panels. He taught gaming law for the National Judicial College and UNLV’s Boyd School of Law and did so much to make gaming, and gaming law respectable and respected. "

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Boyd Students Michael Alires, Anjan Gewali, and Maria Michelle Nisce Author Article for American Bankruptcy Institute Journal

From left: Michael Alires, Anjan Gewali, and Maria Michelle Nisce
Boyd students Michael Alires, Anjan Gewali, and Maria Michelle Nisce recently authored an article for the July issue of the American Bankruptcy Institute Journal. The article is titled Nevada's Boom and Bust.

The article reads, "The Great Recession was at its worst between December 2007 and June 2009, and it hit the state of Nevada particularly hard. The real estate market and Nevada's gaming-driven economy set the stage for the state's troubles. The federal government owns nearly 85 percent of Nevada's land, so it is thus unavailable for development. According to the Census Bureau, Nevada's population increased by more than 700,000 between 2000-10. This 35 percent population increase in Nevada was more than triple the national average and higher than in any other state. Development to accommodate the population growth was constrained by the lack of available land. As a result, prices spiked upward."

Boyd Student Janine Lee Co-Authors Article for American Bankruptcy Institute Journal

Boyd student Janine Lee recently co-authored an article for the July issue of the American Bankruptcy Institute Journal. The article - titled Proper Valuation of Property and Exemptions in Consumer Cases - was co-authored by Marc Stern of The Law Office of Marc Stern in Seattle.

The article reads, "One of the initial questions from most clients is, 'Can I keep my house, car, etc.?' The answer to that question, like most legal questions, is, 'It depends.' Disclosing property and claiming it as exempt is probably one of the most important obligations of the lawyer preparing to file a consumer bankruptcy case. Upon commencement of a bankruptcy case, nonexempt assets become property of the estate. Claiming the asset as exempt allows the debtor to either keep the asset itself or retain specific interests in the asset. It is critical to properly claim exemptions, which ensures that the property exits the bankruptcy with the debtor because it gives the debtor sufficient assets to obtain a fresh start."

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Boyd Alumnus James Davis '05 Appears on What's Your Point? Program

Boyd alumnus James Davis '05 appeared on KSNV News 3's What's Your Point? program on July 7.

"(Nevada does) have a domestic partnership law, but that domestic partnership ends at the border. We live within 50 miles of three states - California might recognize it, but Utah and Arizona definitely aren't going to recognize it. The federal benefits - now the federal government since Windsor is offering all the federal benefits of marriage to everybody regardless of where they live as long as they've been married in a state that has marriage equality. You lose those as soon as you enter Nevada. Our military members - there's an argument that they say their marriage is valid on the base at Nellis, but as soon as leave base and go home, they're not married anymore," he said during the interview.

Professors Rachel Anderson, Stacey Tovino to Attend Southeastern Association of Law Schools Conference

Rachel Anderson is a Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

Stacey Tovino is the Lincy Professor of Law at the Boyd School of Law.

Professors Anderson and Tovino will attend the Southeastern Association of Law Schools 2014 Conference from July 29 to Aug. 6 in Amelia Island, Fla.

Professor Anderson will moderate a panel on “The Future of Reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.”

On Aug. 1, Professor Tovino will give a talk on the law and ethics of grateful patient fundraising as part of a "Hot Issues in Law and Bioethics" panel during a Health Law Workshop. Additionally, on Aug. 5, Professor Tovino will serve as Boyd's representative at the SEALS Steering Committee meeting.

The annual meeting offers legal educators the opportunity to engage with panels and discussion groups on a variety of cutting-edge topics and legal issues, which will prove important for both scholarly work and classroom teaching.

Professor Anderson's research and teaching interests focus on business law, civil and human rights, empirical legal studies, and international law.

Professor Tovino is a leading expert in health law, bioethics, and the medical humanities. 

Professors Leslie Griffin, Mary LaFrance, and Jeffrey Stempel to Present at State Bar of Nevada Annual Meeting

Professors Leslie Griffin, Mary LaFrance, Jeffrey Stempel
Dr. Leslie C. Griffin is a William S. Boyd Professor of Law at UNLV.

Mary LaFrance is the IGT Professor of Intellectual Property Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

Jeffrey Stempel is the Doris S. and Theodore B. Lee Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

All three professors will be presenting at the State Bar of Nevada Annual Meeting on July 10 in Newport Beach, Calif.

Professors Griffin and LaFrance will give a talk titled, “Whistleblower or Tattletale? The Debate over Wikileaks.”

Joined by several State Bar panelists, Professor Stempel will address “Hot Topics in Insurance Law.”

Provost John Valery White, Professor Rachel Anderson to Present at NAACP Convention

John Valery White is the Executive Vice President and Provost for UNLV and a Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law. Rachel Anderson is a Professor of Law at the Boyd School of Law.

Provost White and Professor Anderson will attend the 105th Annual NAACP Convention in Las Vegas from July 19 to 23. Provost White will present on the Continuing Legal Education (CLE) panel titled "School Desegregation - 60 years after Brown v. Board of Education." Professor Anderson will present on the Continuing Legal Education panel titled “Supreme Court Review and Preview.”

The two-day CLE seminar is hosted by the NAACP in conjunction with the National Bar Association.

Provost White was the second dean of the Boyd School of Law and guided the law school through the recession years while continuing its growth and development into a great law school. He became the Executive Vice President and Provost of UNLV in July 2012. He retains his tenure in the law school.

Professor Anderson is the Faculty Adviser for the UNLV NAACP Student Chapter, which has more than 50 graduate and undergraduate student members. Her research and teaching interests focus on business law, civil and human rights, empirical legal studies, and international law.

Professor Rachel Anderson Speaks on Topic of Voter Registration in Nevada

Rachel Anderson is a Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

Professor Anderson gave a presentation in Las Vegas on June 30 for individuals who are registering voters for the 2014 election in Clark County. In particular, she spoke on the topic of voter registration of Nevadans who have been disenfranchised.

Professor Anderson's research and teaching interests focus on business law, civil and human rights, empirical legal studies, and international law.

Monday, July 7, 2014

Associate Professor Michael Kagan, Boyd Students Featured in VEGAS INC

Michael Kagan is an Associate Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Immigration Clinic at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On July 6, he was featured in the VEGAS INC article Many lawyers for many laws.

The article, about some of the more unique areas of law, reads, "... the first 10 years of his career involved setting up legal aid programs for refugees in Cairo, Beirut and Tel Aviv. Before he arrived in Cairo, as many as 80 percent of Sudanese refugees were rejected. After Kagan established his program, that number dropped in half. He said refugees had a hard time communicating their stories in a compelling way that could lead to asylum being granted. 'The idea that a lawyer was involved in this process was almost unheard of,' Kagan said. 'In many ways, I was practicing law where law had never been practiced before.'”

Professor Kagan has written several of the most widely cited articles in the fields of refugee and asylum law. His research on credibility assessment in asylum cases has been repeatedly relied on by federal appellate courts and, according to a 2012 commentary, has "guided most subsequent research and analysis on the topic."

Boyd School of Law students who assist at the Rocky Mountain Innocence Center (RMIC), an organization focused on correcting and preventing the conviction of innocent people, were also featured in the article.

The article reads, "The RMIC team is made up largely of students from UNLV’s William S. Boyd School of Law, who can spend up to two years researching a case. When enough evidence is found to consider a DNA petition, civil attorneys offer pro-bono services."

Boyd Alumna Lucy Flores '10 Featured in Reno Gazette-Journal

On July 2, Boyd alumna Lucy Flores '10 was featured in the Reno Gazette-Journal article Lucy Flores: state contracts should go to Nevada firms.

The article focuses on Flores' recent trip to Reno as part of her campaign for lieutenant governor. During the trip, she appeared on a taping of the Nevada Newsmakers television program, criticizing the Commission on Tourism for hiring an agency outside of Nevada to promote tourism in the state.

The article reads, "'I was very disappointed when they gave that contract to an out-of-state agency to promote Nevada,' Flores said on Newsmakers. 'There were many qualified and capable agencies here in Nevada. Actually, this is one issue I very much care about.'"

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Alumna Linda Marie Norcross '04 Joins Howard & Howard

Boyd alumna Linda Marie Norcross '04 recently joined the law firm of Howard & Howard. On July 1, she was featured in a press release distributed by the firm.

The press release, titled Howard & Howard Welcomes Linda Marie Norcross, reads, "Ms. Norcross focuses her practice on protection and enforcement of intellectual property rights. She advises clients on all facets of trademark prosecution and enforcement, both foreign and domestic, including trademark selection, clearance, proper trademark use, registration and renewals, and related transactions."

The press release continues, "Ms. Norcross represents clients in a wide variety of industries, including gaming, advertising, food and beverage, software, fashion, and entertainment, with special interest and expertise in the resort hotel and casino industry." 

Professor Leslie Griffin Quoted in Las Vegas Review-Journal Article

Dr. Leslie C. Griffin is a William S. Boyd Professor of Law at UNLV.

On July 2, she was quoted in the Las Vegas Review-Journal article Whatever else it is, Hobby Lobby ruling isn't narrow.

The article reads, "Professor Leslie Griffin of UNLV’s Boyd School of Law agreed. Using this case as precedent, why wouldn’t Catholic-owned, closely held corporations argue their belief that all contraception violates their sincerely held religious views and that they should be exempt from providing birth control entirely? 'The breadth of it is incredible,' Griffin said. Griffin added that one of the most disturbing passages is the ruling’s language saying courts should not question religious beliefs even in the process of determining whether a person’s religious freedom is actually burdened." 

Professor Griffin, who teaches constitutional law, is known for her interdisciplinary work in law and religion.

Hamilton and Griffin on Rights Blog Focuses on Burwell v. Hobby Lobby

Dr. Leslie C. Griffin is a William S. Boyd Professor of Law at UNLV.

In March, Professor Griffin co-launched a blog with Marci Hamilton of the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law at Yeshiva University. The blog, named Hamilton and Griffin on Rights, focuses on the intersection of religion, feminism, and reproductive rights.

As such, posts on the blog in recent days have been focused on the Burwell v. Hobby Lobby decision. Articles include Some Thoughts from a Health Lawyer on Hobby Lobby, What’s Really Wrong With the Decisions in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Wood v. Burwell? (From Justia.com), Bishops’ Lobby Provides Win for Hobby Lobby, and more. To see all the coverage, click here

Professor Griffin, who teaches constitutional law, is known for her interdisciplinary work in law and religion.

Professor Ruben Garcia Writes Article for Hamilton and Griffin on Rights Blog

http://law.unlv.edu/faculty/ruben-garcia.htmlRuben J. Garcia is a Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On July 1, he wrote an article for the Hamilton and Griffin on Rights blog titled, "Harris v. Quinn: The Supreme Court Further Marginalizes Public Employees."

In the article, he wrote, "A political path remains after Harris v. Quinn that States can follow to ensure home healthcare worker bargaining arrangements pass constitutional muster. Nonetheless, as many of these workers are among the most politically vulnerable in society – low-wage earners, women, people of color and noncitizens – they will lack the political power to easily change legislation for their benefit and the benefit of their clients or customers, who are alone, disabled, elderly and ill. In Harris v. Quinn, the Supreme Court has once again marginalized these employees, and the people for whom they work."

A recognized expert in the field of labor and employment law, Professor Garcia teaches Labor Law, Employment Law, Constitutional Law, and Professional Responsibility at the Boyd School of Law. He has been quoted in the Los Angeles Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Las Vegas Review-Journal, among others, and has appeared on national and local radio and television programs.

Professor Angela Morrison Writes Article for Hamilton and Griffin on Rights Blog

Angela Morrison is a Visiting Assistant Professor at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On June 30, her article, "NAME & SHAME - The Excommunication of Mormon Feminist Kate Kelly," was published on the Hamilton and Griffin on Rights blog.

"The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints excommunicated Kate Kelly, the founder of a movement called 'Ordain Women,' which has urged the Church through public advocacy and protests to reconsider its stance denying women the priesthood. I think Kelly’s strategy of naming and shaming the Church is important and I hope that she and her colleagues are successful in changing the Church’s policy regarding an all-male priesthood because allowing gender discrimination in a private, voluntary organization like the Church can have enormous consequences on society as a whole," she wrote in the article.

Professor Morrison graduated from the Boyd School of Law where she was the editor-in-chief of the Nevada Law Journal and was a student attorney in the Immigration Clinic. Professor Morrison teaches in the Immigration Clinic and Employment Discrimination.

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Professor Sylvia Lazos Featured on KSNV News 3

Sylvia Lazos is the Justice Myron Leavitt Professor of Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law.

On June 30, she was featured in the KSNV News 3 segment Funding formula funneled to Nevada students with high needs.

"We're 49th in terms of graduation rates, and... our reading proficiencies for ELL children are below special ed children by the time they get to eighth grade," she said during the segment.

Professor Lazos is a frequent op-ed contributor, and her expertise is sought by print and broadcast media on a wide range of subjects, including higher education, immigration, race relations, government, voting and initiatives.